How the midterm results will affect Trump

ABC News' team of political analysts weighs in on what the election results mean for President Donald Trump's legislative agenda and his campaign for re-election in 2020.
4:10 | 11/07/18

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Transcript for How the midterm results will affect Trump
All right, George. I think you're right. Let's bring in our political panel, Jon Karl, Jersey governor, Chris Christie, Matthew dowd and Donna Brazile. You can cut the results in so many different ways. It's almost like we have two different countries living inside our borders. And each are doing well among their group. What I said last night on the election outcome it's geography where there's more red states and Democrats have demography which is a growing group of voters that are voting more with them and won the popular vote last night but doesn't do either side any good and that's why we had another split decision to run up the score in home games but not be able to score in away games and that's what each side is E is doing. President trump, there's no question about it, he added to his majority but waking up to a new world in Washington this morning. It's an entirely new world. They will control the agenda in the house and they will be issuing subpoenas left and right, not just personally investigating the president but his administration. Those Republicans have been protecting him now the Democrats that are in charge will be going after him but, George, remember, this is a majority between 9 and 12 seats. A very narrow majority in the house, even narrower than what John Boehner had when he was speaker and saw how lard it was for him. Difficult for Nancy Pelosi if she is chosen and a different house now. It's younger. It is also experienced. It's fresh and what Democrats wanted most yesterday was to have a seat at the table so that we can litigate issues like health care, protecting people with pre-existing conditions. This was a historic loss for a president with low approval ratings -- but a good strong economy. Democrats will go back to Washington, D.C. And sit down with Donald Trump and try to come up with a bargain on health care, infrastructure and, of course, lowering taxes for the middle class. That is next year. The story last night Democrats pick up six seats. Six switches. On the other hand Republican hold the big state, Florida and Ohio. Yeah, I think when you were talking about that, the fact there were 26 governorships that the Republicans were defending and 12 were open seats, you know you'll lose some. They lost some last night, the biggest disappointment was losing Scott walker in Wisconsin, a senior governor going for his third term, fourth run in eight years so I think that was disappointing but holding on to Ohio and Florida, enormous not only for 2020 but for redrinking in '21/'22. You have known president trump for many years and worked with him on many things. He's going to come out with his first press conference after the defeat in the house. Is there any way he can change, he's not going to change his style but H manner of governing? Oh, yeah, and I think he will. You know, I think for his core issues for him, the things he cares about are the trade issue and the immigration issue and I don't know that you'll see a lot of change in there but I do think you'll see him reach out to Democrats on things like infrastructure, on shall Ares like prison and sentencing reform and try to cut deals where he can make the argument in 2020, hey, I've been bipartisan and passed these things with them. He could get democratical lies on trade. He could and on infrastructure, this could have been how he started his presidency but now, George, we're looking at a trillion dollar deficit. There's not much money left to come out with a big expensive new infrastructure. The problem is the tribes of each side are giving each side no incentive. They won't give Nancy Pelosi any incentive or Donald Trump incentive to cut any deals. When you're giving away money everybody has insensitive and governors all over the country -- The debt continues to increase. Of course. But new democratic governors are going to say, send that money to help me rebuild my infrastructure. Democrats raise the debt ceilings and they won't turn a blind eye to the kind of corruption and abuse of power they've seen come out of the trust white house. Thank you very much. Let's go to ginger. We have to warn you this is

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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