Royal Caribbean announces 1st ‘vaccinated’ cruise, but is it safe?

As travel bookings tick up for the summer, infectious disease experts weigh in on how to safely travel this year and share how they’re planning their summer vacations.
3:09 | 03/04/21

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Royal Caribbean announces 1st ‘vaccinated’ cruise, but is it safe?
Now we'll go to the summer vacation planning. It's on as more get vaccinated and top doctors are saying they might feel comfortable traveling but under a few conditions. It's a story we first saw in "The Washington post." Gio Benitez at Newark airport with more. Good morning, gio. Reporter: Hey, Michael. Good morning. We're already seeing a steady increase in travel numbers so this morning we ask six top infectious disease experts about their own plans this summer and their advice for you. Take a look. This morning, mauj just from the cruise industry, royal caribbean saying its newest ship is set to hit the seas in may from Israel. But this time all passengers must be vaccinated. It's just one of the signs that people are eager to travel. And with the news that the musk will have enough vaccine supply for every adult by the end of may, many are already making plans. We're seeing a huge surge in demand specifically for spring and summer travel in the last two weeks alone. Reporter: But is it safe? "Gma" spoke with six infectious disease experts all saying they're optimistic about taking a trip this summer as long as cases continue to lower and with other caveats. Being vaccinated. These vaccines are highly effective against disease particularly severe disease and so that really changes the math about what we're willing to do. Reporter: Dr. Natalie Dean is planning on traveling. While her kids won't be vaccinated she knows children can spread the disease but points to the data that shows severe illness is less common among young children. In the state's reporting the American academy of pediatrics says up to 2% of child covid cases result in hospitalization. Dr. David Ruben says he's also feeling hopeful about traveling to see family this summer. My mother has fully received her vaccinations and it feels safer. With declining transmission that opportunity is open. Not just for my family but many out there as we encourage our loved ones to get the vaccination. Reporter: All six of the experts we talk to agree being vaccinated is the safe factor for traveling and say they would feel safe traveling by plan wearing a mask. The CDC is asking Americans not to travel still. No word if that will change by summer but even with vaccinations, it's critical that we watch the numbers and keep doing the simple things like wearing masks, washing hands and spending time outside. We've really turned a corner and can make plan force summer and thinking about end points, important for the optimism of the American public. Reporter: Our experts say maybe choose direct flights so you spend less time traveling and less time in airports but we should tell you all six of these doctors say that if they see a rise in cases this summer, they're going to cancel these plans so just keep watching those number, guys, back to you. To travel or not to travel is the question. Now to ginger. Good morning, ginger.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"3:09","description":"As travel bookings tick up for the summer, infectious disease experts weigh in on how to safely travel this year and share how they’re planning their summer vacations. ","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"76246702","title":"Royal Caribbean announces 1st ‘vaccinated’ cruise, but is it safe?","url":"/GMA/Travel/video/royal-caribbean-announces-1st-vaccinated-cruise-safe-76246702"}