South hit by record October heat

ABC News chief meteorologist Ginger Zee tracks hotter than normal temperatures and flash flooding threats in parts of the U.S.
1:12 | 10/04/19

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Transcript for South hit by record October heat
Now to that historic record heat in the south. A flash flooding threat and ginger tracking the latest. Good morning to you. Good morning, Cecilia. Raleigh, North Carolina, hit 100 degrees yesterday. You say, well, that's Raleigh, they do that. No. That is the latest they've ever hit 100 degrees. The last record was September 10th so almost a month later. They are starting to feel the front but all that heat is squeezed from Columbus, Georgia, to Columbia will feel above 100. Not only is that responsible for the heat but ushering in gulf moisture and a flood threat to the state of New Mexico. The Sacramento mountains, they're all going to play a part so moisture coming in at the middle levels or lower in the atmosphere. It rolls up and we get closer into the mountains, just south and east of Albuquerque, you can see what happen, the moisture rises on the topography and you can enhance those thunderstorms. So you could see this morning up to 3 inches of rain, even Albuquerque has a small stream, you know, advisory in effect so that will all end then we'll get more rain this weekend, George.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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