Stars of 'The Florida Project' say they hope the film spotlights marginalized communities

Actress Bria Vinaite said she hopes "people walk away realizing this is a serious thing," as she and other cast members of the new film opened up in an interview with ABC News' Robin Roberts.
3:56 | 12/27/17

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Transcript for Stars of 'The Florida Project' say they hope the film spotlights marginalized communities
Now to the little film. It's one of the must see movies of the year. It's "The Florida project." Robin sat down with the pint size stars stunning audiences on screen and off. I got a video tape of the kids illegally entering the utility room. Reporter: The Florida project is an authentic look at a community living in poverty in the shadow of Disney world. Bree I can't vin plays a young single mother to Brooklynn prince. They live in some extreme circumstances. Children see things difrently than we do. It's sort of I guess the struggle they're going through through their eyes and the adults that are struggling around them and trying to figure life out. Reporter: You're a mother daughter dual in the movie. Such a bond you have. She's my mini best friend. Reporter: How did you connect Brooklyn? We started playing barbies and reading books together. Reporter: Moony leads her band of rascals with va leer I can't Cotto and Christopher Rivera. They're both little trouble makers. They meet Janney. That's you. They just become altogher in the little rascal gangs. These are the rooms we're not supposed to go in. Reporter: The welfare motel where they live is managed by Hollywood veteran will I can't Dafoe who quickly captured the hearts of the star. I'm going to talk to Ashley. When your friend puts you in charge of her kid that kid becomes your responsibility. Reporter: Mr. Dafoe. Yes. I love Mr. Dafoe. He's the best. Mr. Dafoe was awesome. He wanted to blend in. Reporter: While the film has moments of happiness and humor it highlights a serious issue of marginalized communities living in poverty which is a reality for many. If somebody saw the film, I would say how is the film, they would say it's sad, funny, very emotional. Then I would say I know, but don't let that happen to your family and in the real world. I hope people walk away realizing this is a serious thing happening in a lot of different communities. I want them to help. Reporter: I hope people have a reaction to watching your talented faces. Thank you robin. Reporter: You're very welcome Brooklyn. To prove I was watching -- ice cream? Oh, my god. I'm actually really excited. Reporter: Remember the last time you had ice cream for breakfast. What just happened? You want sprinkles? This is the best morning ever. Reporter: We didn't ask your moms. Mom, is that okay?

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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