Dan Abrams: 'Schools are Going to Start Doing More as a Result of a Case Like This'

ABC News' legal analyst reports on the split verdict, and the precedent it sets.
2:52 | 08/30/15

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Transcript for Dan Abrams: 'Schools are Going to Start Doing More as a Result of a Case Like This'
And ABC chief legal analyst Dan Abrams joins us now. He's been following the case from the start. Dan, was justice served here? Was this a compromised verdict? Yeah, I think you can make a very strong argument that justice was served. This is a very tough case for the prosecutors from the beginning. You had these messages that she sent after the fact. That were friendly and flirty. She did the nurse was consensual. It was a very tough case for prosecutors. And yet the jury was also convinced that he lied about whether they had sex. And so, he's facing a series of charges related to the fact that he was 18 and she was 15. He was convicted of all those challenges he would never would have faced if these prosecutors and this jury felt there was more to the story. You're seeing sort of a compromised verdict. And he's facing real time. The possibility of real time behind bars. Dan, one of the things that's interesting about this, he did face a felony charge, as gio reported, for enticing a minor on a computer, explain that, is that what that law was about? He's now facing up to seven years. That's the most serious counterhe's facing. Of course this was not the scenario they had in mind when they enacted this law. Think about it, if every senior who sent a message on their computer to a freshman was to be charged and convicted on that crime, we would have a lot of people behind bars. But the reality is, in this case with these facts, these prosecutors believed they could make an argument on it, and clearly these jurors accepted it. I think if you asked all these jurors in other cases, do you think this law should be used to prosecute every 18-year-old? Absolutely not. But if you asked them in this case, is it proper to use this law to prosecute this 18-year-old? Why, because I think that these jurors were convinced that Owen Labrie behaved terribly. Dan -- Didn't have enough evidence -- Dan, we have about 50 seconds. The statement from the the statement from the victim's parents, critical of the school and the environment there, are schools doing enough to prevent this? Look, I think schools are going to start doing more as a result of a case like this. But I should say, to those who say, a case like this is going to prevent rape victims for coming before, I said it's the opposite. Even if they did things wrong after the fact, they could get some amount of justice as was the case here. Okay, thank you so much for joining us, Dan.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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