Frantic negotiations continue over bill to rescue American economy

The $2 trillion plan would give most Americans a $1,200 check and $500 per child, but the biggest sticking point is a proposed $500 billion relief fund for corporations.
2:49 | 03/23/20

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Transcript for Frantic negotiations continue over bill to rescue American economy
We're glad the recovery has become quick for you. We'll see you tomorrow. And next to American families who want to know, when will we get help? Including the $1,200 checks for individuals who make $75,000, and less for people who make over $99,000. What is going on? Here's Mary Bruce on the hill tonight. Reporter: Tonight on capitol hill, frantic negotiations over the nearly $2 trillion bill to rescue the American economy. We are very close to reaching a deal. Very close. And our goal is to reach a deal today. Reporter: But they're not there yet. Twice in 24 hours Democrats have blocked the Republican bill, insisting it puts big businesses ahead of American workers. And doesn't do enough to help families, health care workers, and hospitals. But Republicans say Democrats are playing politics. This is not a juicy political opportunity, this is a national emergency. Reporter: The bill would give millions of Americans a $1,200 check and $500 per child. But the biggest sticking point, a $500 billion relief fund for corporations. Democrats say it's a slush fund to dole out money with few strings attached. On the senate floor today, anger and frustration. Is there objection? Thank you, Mr. President. I object. Oh, come on! I object. This is unbelievable. You know what Americans are thinking right now, Mr. President? They're thinking this country was founded by geniuses. But is being run by a bunch of idiots. Reporter: Congress tonight racing the clock and the virus itself. Rand Paul now the first senator, and third member of congress, to test positive. More than a dozen lawmakers in quarantine. Amy klobuchar's husband has bested positive and is in the hospital. The senator saying not being by his side is hard. The white house, acutely aware of the staggering economic impact of social distancing. Our country wasn't built to be shut down. Reporter: The president tweeting in all caps, "We cannot let the cure be worse than the problem itself." But trump's closest ally on the hill, senator linsey graham strongly pushing back, tweeting, "When it comes to how to fight coronavirus, I'm making my decisions based on healthcare professionals, not political punditry." The treasury secretary has been going back and forth all day long, trying to work this out. They're optimistic, but there is still no deal. They're hoping the checks will go out to Americans early next bottom line, we don't know when that will happen. Mary, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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