Viewing 'Ring of Fire' solar eclipse from an airplane

ABC News meteorologist Rob Marciano joined a group of 30 die-hard eclipse chasers 39,000 feet in the air to view the celestial event from the skies.
1:27 | 06/10/21

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Transcript for Viewing 'Ring of Fire' solar eclipse from an airplane
air. Reporter: Just after sunrise this morning, the moon at its furthest point from the Earth passed in front of the sun. It's called the ring of fire. In New York City, it appeared like a crescent moon. Beautiful, but this was just a partial eclipse. The annular eclipse's path traveling over Ontario, across Greenland, over the north pole and through siberia. Here we go. So to get the full ring of fire experience, we flew on a special charter flight dubbed "Eclipse air." Welcome aboard our eclipse flight today. Reporter: Taking off from Minneapolis, more than 30 die hard eclipse chasers all with a window seat to this cosmic event. It's about 80% covered right now. Here's what it looked like at 39,000 feet. The plane flying above three-quarters of the atmosphere, making the eclipse appear even bringer. Magical. Reporter: For the passengers on board, it was a celestial dream come true. I felt my heart was so open. I cried and I could see the moon in front of the sun. And it was literally -- something happened for me spiritually. Reporter: David, I feel the same way. The next an ewe lar eclipse is in 2023.- the next total eclipse here in the U.S. In 2024. Both will be equally awesome. Not a bad day at the office, rob. Glad you're back on solid ground there. Good to have you. And good to have you at home. We'll see you right back here

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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