Juneteenth and allyship

ABC News' Linsey Davis explores how a family in Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, found themselves hosting conversations with their predominantly white neighbors about race.
2:32 | 06/19/21

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Transcript for Juneteenth and allyship
Adorable. Now to our "Gma" cover juneteenth was declared a national holiday, widely celebrated by black Americans. It was relatively unknown, though, to other communities until the social unrest of 2020. Now, many are learning the importance of being an ally to people of color. ABC's linsey Davis takes a look. Reporter: Chambersburg, Pennsylvania, is rooted in American history. It was rumored to be a stop on the underground railroad and burned down in 1864 by the confederacy. It is small town America. Overwhelmingly Republican and mostly white. A place where Linda and Marvin worthy and their 11-year-old daughter tail call home. Was there ever a time you felt unwelcome in chambersburg because of your race? I received a phone call once, asking if I was Marvin worthy, and that I understand my wife decided to enroll in your service, but I found out you were . We want to withdraw. I said, excuse me? Reporter: They turned their personal struggle into action, forming a group called racial reconciliation. Marvin and I decided that we were going to start to have conversations about how we can reconcile around the issue of race in our own community. Reporter: For the next few years, they hosted uncomfortable conversations, mostly with their white neighbors, about what it really means to be an ally. It's not enough to be anti-racist. You have to combat it. What do you do in a room full of white people, for example, when language is happening that's offensive to people of color? Stand in the gap for people who are absent. That's the real work. Reporter: And then George Floyd was killed. Big cities erupted into protests. And to the surprise of some, so did chambersburg. The hands holding the signs of protests here were overwhelmingly white, chanting a phrase that was once unthinkable. Black lives matter. Reporter: Those uncomfortable conversations paid off when hundreds showed up for a demonstration organized by the worthies last juneteenth. We're standing strong, steadfast. We've never seen that before in our community. There was a group of black women in a car that stopped, who had tears rolling down their faces and said, "You can't even imagine what this means to me." And that was our linsey Davis

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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