ABC News’ contributor Dr. Darien Sutton discusses new COVID-19 discoveries

Dr. Sutton says that aerosols are not a significant source of COVID-19 transmission.
2:13 | 07/12/20

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Transcript for ABC News’ contributor Dr. Darien Sutton discusses new COVID-19 discoveries
All right, zohreen shah for us. Joining us is Dr. Darien Sutton. Thanks so much for being with us. You specialized in emergency you were here in New York City during the worst of the pandemic. You just moved to L.A. A few weeks ago, how does it compare. It feels like I'm stepping back in time. There's an underlying sense of fear in the community of what's to come. As we've seen in New York, we had stable and decreases rates around 1% positive for covid testing. In California, rates are continuing to increase, and so it just feels like I'm stepping back into April in New York to be honest. There's also some new renewed concern about if this virus is now airborne. One study finding that it stays in the air for 16 hours in a controlled lab setting, a lot of people find this alarming, what should we know about this and how should that affect our behavior? Yes, I saw that headline as well and it's a really discussion of semantics. This science has been continually researched. What we found, in laboratory conditions, the virus, using different tools, continues to stay in the air for long periods of time, more than an hour, two hours. In reality, I don't think that it's the same in real life. Because if that was the case and the virus was able to last in the air for that long period of time I think we'd see higher numbers. Especially inside the hospital for healthcare workers like myself who are continuously confronted with this virus. Talking about some of the patients that you're seeing, is it true that some of the younger patients are reporting different symptoms than the older ones? Yeah, that's something that myself and other physicians have seen since the beginning of March. Patients under the age of 40 are coming in with different complaints, not typical of the fever, shortness of breath and cough. Younger patients are coming in with headaches, body aches, nausea and lack of smell. I think this is more of a sign this virus is probably more prevalent in the community than we already know. Dr. Sutton, thank you for joining us this morning. We appreciate your time.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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