Hundreds of thousands still without power after major storms

Nearly half a million people are still affected by outages caused by the severe storms, which has prompted short-term solutions like setting up in parking lots to try to continue to working online.
2:34 | 08/12/20

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Transcript for Hundreds of thousands still without power after major storms
Back now on "Gma" with more than half a million Americans still struggling with power outages this morning after those major storms, Eva pilgrim has some expert advice on staying connected while working from home. Reporter: Millions without power, some for days at a time. Many still dealing with the after-effects of last week's deadly storm. The next day passed and finally the whole town was just going nuts. Reporter: This week dozens of people lined up outside this cable store all desperate for internet. Staying connected is even more critical now for many people working from home during the pandemic. Today at work I'm sitting in my car, the library has free why buy that extends into the parking lot. Reporter: Some setting up shop in parking lots of libraries. That's what Julia and several of her neighbors did after they lost power in their Connecticut town for six days. People just set up mobile offices. It was packed where people were just working on their laptops in the back of their cars. Reporter: Experts say another option, turn your cell phone into a wi-fi hot spot. You take a device like your mobile phone that you have a data signal for and share that connection with another device like a laptop. And then your laptop or your tablet or your smart TV connects to that wi-fi hot spot. It's just sharing the data connection on your phone. Reporter: But with a possibly active hurricane season churning away what can you do before the storm? Experts say charge your old laptop, think of it as a power bank to use for other items. I could charge my phone for days from that. Reporter: What about food? Losing power in the middle of a heat wave can mean lots of lost food and medicine. Some companies will reimburse you. Con Edison is offering up to $540 for spoiled foods and more for refrigerated medicine for customers that lost power for more than 48 hours due to Isaias, but you need to show receipts or photos. And as far as getting in touch with your power or cable company, experts tell us that the best way might not be waiting on the phone call but actually to take to social media, sometimes that gets you the quickest response, robin, I've tried it. It does work. Oh. Do tell, Eva pilgrim. All right. Great advice. Appreciate it.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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