New report highlights potential health risks of Spin classes

Dr. Sabrina M. Strickland discusses a recent report that found 42 cases of a painful and potentially life-threatening condition in people who had completed their very first Spin class.
4:17 | 07/19/17

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Transcript for New report highlights potential health risks of Spin classes
The New York Times citing a new report highlighting a very rare, extremely painful, and potentially life-threatening situation. We're talking about severe muscle tra ma. A diagnosis called rabdo. The woman we're about to speak to, her muscles hurt, she started vomiting. And her kidneys started to fail. Christina is a kindergarten teacher on her feel all day long. A two day a week gym goer. When she took her first ever spin class, she landed in the hospital. The class was very fun. We were encouraged to keep going, not give up, give our all. Give our best. Reporter: The next day, she was H so much pain, she could barely stand. My muscles kept swelling and swelling. I started vomiting. Reporter: Doctors diagnosed her with a rare condition called rhabdomyolysis. Muscle tissue breaks down and has toxins. Appropriate exercise builds muscle. When you overexert yourself. Do something your booed is not used to. You do just too far. That can cause massive muscle break down. And that is rhabdomyolysis. Reporter: A recent report documents 42 cases of people developing rhabdo after taking their first spin class. Is is exercise a bad thing? Absolutely not. It's important that when you start exercise, you break in early. Start easy. Go to spin class. But start easy and build up. Reporter: As for Christina, she's made a full recovery. Is working out again. And encouraging others to listen to their bodies. You know your body better than anyone else. If they tell you to push yourself and you don't think it feels good, listen. Reporter: And we do want to stress this is extremely rare. Authors of this report are calling for safety guidelines to the spinning industry. They want the public to know when to increase intensity, to stay hydrated. And to know the signs and symptoms of rhabdo. It's not an exercise you start out at full strength. And good instructors do that. Thank you, Paul will. We're joined by Dr. Sabrina Strickland. She's a sports medicine specialist. You got me back in the game with my shoulder surgery. And, Lara had a hip done there. We know you very well. This particular condition we have to stress, rare, rare, rare. Because people are going to think, is spinning okay to do? Of course it is, right? Jt absolutely. I think it's all about how you go into any type of class. Kosz-fit or spinning. You wouldn't do out and run a marathon the very first time. It's a matter of taking it easy. One of the things about spinning, it's this herd mentali mentality. I'm going to keep up. Not on your first spin. Or second. What are the symptoms? While you're working out, you're going to feel like you're starting to lose form. You'll lose control. You won't be able to stand up on the the bike and have the same kind of control. Afterward, you're going to have real muscle pain. Not soreness, real pain. Your urine will be dark. Because of the toxins? Basically, you're melting your muscle. It's degenerating or dissolving. That gets in your blood stream. Your urine should not be dark. A lot of us go class. They're like, push it. Go hard. When do you know when you're pushing it too hard or when row do need to exert yourself a little bit? What is that fine line? I think when you start any new exercise, running or spinning, you have to go easy on yourself in the beginning. When the instructor is saying go hard, that's for your third week or fourth week, when you're doing it three or four times a week. Know your body. You know when you should shut it down. Absolutely. If you're standing on the bike and having trouble keeping your balance, that's too hard.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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