More answers to your COVID-19 questions

ABC News chief medical correspondent Dr. Jen Ashton on the difference between reactive antibodies and neutralizing antibodies and how to tell the difference between allergy symptoms and coronavirus.
3:12 | 06/10/20

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Transcript for More answers to your COVID-19 questions
Let's turn now to our Dr. Jen Ashton with more of your questions about coronavirus. First question, what is the difference between reactive antibodies and neutralizing antibodies? Okay, so some mini-med school here, reactive antibodies are proteins or these immune system fighters that our body makes after we've been exposed to or infected by a virus, whether they neutralize or block is a totally different story and, you know, I can't help but think of football or a sports move when you hear blocking but that's literally what we're talking about, do they recognize this infectious agent in the future and do they protect us? That are kind of two different shades of gray here. We still don't know how long this protection may last when it comes to particular strain of coronavirus. All right, next question, I'm interested in because I haven't stopped sneezing, allergy season is here, what's the best way to tell the difference between allergy symptoms and coronavirus symptoms The first thing I would say is, you know your body and your symptoms. You know how you react basically every year. The other thing is, there are some common symptoms and signs that are shared between seasonal allergies or hay fever and coronavirus. The big difference is, you don't get a fever with allergies. You don't get body aches with allergies. Nor do you get some of the other more rare symptoms that we've been hearing about with covid-19, G.I. System, or loss of smell and taste. Again, you know yourself. But if you have other symptoms in a hotspot and exposed you might want to think covid. That's very important to remember. What precautions should be taken when newborns come into contact with visitors at home? I literally just got a personal e-mail about this question myself. There's no official guidance on this. You have to use common sense and proceed with caution. It would be ideal if there was a rapid test that someone could get five minutes before seeing a newborn and get retested every time you see that newborn, that doesn't exist yet. So I would say that there are a couple of options -- if you're a new grandparent, you can rigorously self-quarantine for 14 days before going to meet your grandbaby and you're reasonably sure that you haven't been exposed. If you can't do that, vigorous hand hygiene, washing your hands, possibly even wearing gloves when handling the baby. Minimizing close-range contact. Unfortunately for now. Not ideal, but at least you can see the baby. Next question, do we know if there's any permanent or chronic damage from catching the coronavirus? We don't note yet. Remember the time line, this virus is in its infancy, it's only about six months old, we need one-year, ten-year data on this to look for signs of cardiac symptoms and manifestations. Pulmonary and or psychology, we just don't know it's too early. And you can submit questions to Dr. Jen on her Instagram at @drjashton. As families and workers and

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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