Marvel's 'Hero Project' spotlights youth making effort to positively change communities

The new Disney+ docuseries follows 20 youth working to implement positive change on the issues they care about, including transgender rights and protecting sacred indigenous land.
5:42 | 02/14/20

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Transcript for Marvel's 'Hero Project' spotlights youth making effort to positively change communities
My name is tokata. And I greet you today with a good heart and a handshake. She's not your typical teenager. Where are all my indiginous people at? Make some noise! 16 year old tokata iron eyes is a young woman on a mission, to make the world a better place. Amid a sea of protesters, tokata is joining a new generation of activists like Greta Thunberg working to raise awareness about climate change. Advocating for women's rights in Washington, D.C. And leading a group of native-americans in a fight to protect their sacred land from development. Tokata sounds like a superhero. And the place where most superheroes got their start wholeheartedly agrees. My name is tokata iron eyes. And I'm a marvel superhero. She is one of 20 extraordinary people featured in a series on Disney plus. The entire idea is to sort of find out who these kids are, which is a massive research project, and why they are marvel-specific heroes. It's getting to know them, their families, the work they're doing, the communities, where they live, and start building out a narrative from there. Speaking specifically to the characters within the hero project, who comes to mind and the attributes that they all share? 1.34. There's Jordan, who has a prosthetic arm and is doing a lot to make the concept of design more inclusive. People who are disabled have the ability to problem-solve. We eventually got to the point that compressed air was the way to go to push the glitter out. We'll make it into a unicorn horn. And then there's Adonis, who is a blind football player and doesn't see his blindness as an obstacle. And that in itself is just, you know, the epitome of fearlessness. When I see him in his uniform, you know, for those three hours, his Jersey is like his cape. He's my hero. I first heard and sought word transgender, when I was 8 years old. Reporter: Assigned male at birth, Rebecca is raising awareness for transgender youth. I've been living as a girl since I was 8 years old, and now I'm 10. Reporter: She not only began to embrace who she was but became empowered by it. Every transgendered kid deserves the support I get, and that's why I'm here. What makes tokata a super hero? She champions her independent voice, and she uses her voice to help empower others. Tell me about your name, takota iron eyes. It means future, like shout out to the parents, and "Iron eyes" is my father's last name. I grew up in standing rock. Respect our water, respect our land and our people. Reporter: She was just 12 years old when she spoke up in this video. ABC's cameras show standing rock supporters staring down law enforcement over the rights to what natives say is a sacred site. She was part of a group of indigenous youth who helped steer this movement from the very beginning. During that time, it was really important that we had our own cameras and media outlets to share our own stories. It made me proud to live on standing rock and to be indigenous and to be surrounded by the people that I was surrounded by. Reporter: Although the protesters weren't successful in stopping the pipeline from being built, what she learned from standing up for her values left an impression. She is true to the universe, so she's true to herself. She's a seeker. She's brave, she's a risk taker. There's a power compelling her to do the things that she does. Reporter: Disney is the parent company of marvel and in true marvel fashion, each get the true recognition they I'm feeling really good and happy and really loved. Oh, my gosh, I'm going to cry. Oh, my gosh! The marvel design, on the box, on the jacket, it's a big deal. See you on the cover. There's me. What's it like being in a comic book as yourself? I feel definitely very appreciative and so grateful for that opportunity, and also what comic, like, represents. And just like the progress that I think it shows. It's so surreal. It's you. Reporter: For "Nightline,"

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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