Boeing's CEO acknowledges link between 2 deadly 737 MAX crashes

A sensor malfunctioned seconds after takeoff in the Ethiopian Airlines crash; sources told ABC News they believe a bird strike triggered an anti-stall system.
1:55 | 04/04/19

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Transcript for Boeing's CEO acknowledges link between 2 deadly 737 MAX crashes
tonight to the horrifying description from inside the cockpit of that Boeing max jet that crashed, the second one to go down. The ethiopians now saying tonight, quote, the crew performed all of the procedures provided by the manufacturer. And yet, they couldn't save the plane. And tonight, Boeing now with a stunning acknowledgement. What they're now saying. And here's ABC's David Kerley. Reporter: The first look tonight at the drama in the cockpit before the second deadly crash. A sensor malfunctions seconds after takeoff. Sources tell ABC news they believe it was a bird strike triggering that anti-stall system, mcas, nosing down the plane twice before the pilots shut off the system. The Boeing procedure. But they can't manually nose up the plane, possibly because the jet's high speed is putting too much pressure on the stabilizer as alarms sound. Pull up. Reporter: Then, counter to the Boeing guidelines, the data shows the pilots turned the power back on. Mcas misfiring again, sending them into a steeper dive and crash. Shared blame according to a former NTSB investigator. Certainly, the design of the aircraft, the design of the system, the information provided to pilots, but also, the pilots themselves and how they reacted to the situation. Reporter: And tonight, Boeing's CEO acknowledging the link between the crashes. It's our responsibility to eliminate this risk. We own it and we know how to do it. All right, David Kerley with us live. He's been on this story from the start. And David, we just heard Boeing's CEO saying, "We own it." It must have really concerned them that the pilots at least at first did what they were supposed to do and it still didn't keep the jet in the air. Reporter: Puzzled why they turned the system back on. Also, the speed. 94% of thrust. The plane going so fast. If you want to hand trim that plane, you got to go at a slower speed, David. All right, David Kerley with us tonight. David, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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