New book helps women reclaim more time for themselves

Eve Rodsky, author of “Fair Play,” shows couples how to build a stronger marriage by sharing the workload at home.
3:46 | 10/07/19

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Transcript for New book helps women reclaim more time for themselves
Now you meet the expert called the Marie Kondo of relationships, in her book "Fair play" eve rodsky offers up a new system for sharing workload at home. And starts with playing a simple game that divides up household tasks and can build a stronger marriage. We're talking to the author in a moment. First take a look at "Fair play." Come on. Really? You got three lemons. Reporter: An argument all couples can relate to. How to share the responsibilities at home. I worked all day. Went to the market, I cleaned this entire condo then I've been cooking for the last three hours. Come on, help set the table. Reporter: Now with her new book, "Fair play," eve rodsky has a solution. It's as simple as shuffling a deck of cards and playing the hand that's been dealt to you. "Fair play"'s method being cheered on from celebs like busy Philipps and Reese Witherspoon. She says each person can feel empowered to ace their task from conception to planning and execution. No reminders, no nagging and no excuses. George is laughing. We're joined now by eve rrodsky, author of "Fair play." Every woman at home is going, yeah, I say deal the cards out to the kids too. That's my playbook. But tell me this because I think women, we have to take some responsibility here because we talk about gender equal and yet we kind of feel like we need to be the ones who take on the majority of the household tanks, the child care issues, even the vacation planning and maybe some of us even want to like the control part of it. Yeah, I think that's interesting. But I will say I didn't feel the need to have to do it all but I felt like I was expected to do it all. And this is what happened to me after my second son was born, I got a text from my husband that had me sobbing on the side of the road and that text said, I'm surprised you didn't get blueberries. Oh. And you can picture the scene. I had a breast pump in my passenger seat, returns for my new baby in the backseat, I have a client contract on my lap with a pen between my legs trying to mark it up as I'm going between traffic stops to pick up my first son from his preschool program and I knew I was going to be late to pick up Zack, my son and I was sobbing thinking what I was really thinking was if my marriage is going to end it should be over something way more dramatic like an affair than blueberries. I was thinking how did I become the default or the she fault for every household tank. I think he's the one sobbing right now. He's holding all the cards. Tell us about this idea of invisible work. As I went on a quest to figure out a solution for domestic rebalance, interviewing 500 people and experts in every area I found out there's a lot of names for what we're talking about, second shift, emotional labor, but invisible work is my favorite name for it because there's a beacon of solution in there because how do you value what you don't see? Right. So if you can make the invisible visible which I did with a fair play cards then things start to change. Men have to do what you've been doing behind the scene and suddenly notice it. Have you this game called fair play so you have four rules to play. What are they? The rules are first is all time is created equal and that came from my finding that men and women in society view men's time as finite like diamonds and women's time as infinite like sand. Great stuff. A lot of good advice in the book. "Fair play" is in book stores right now. Thank you for coming in.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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