2 women believed to be 1st to carry same baby

Bliss and Ashleigh Coulter, of Mountain Springs, Texas, found a way to both be part of the birth process for their son, Stetson.
2:22 | 10/30/18

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Transcript for 2 women believed to be 1st to carry same baby
Something rare, two women, one baby. We'll speak with Dr. Ashton in a moment. First their story. He's our miracle baby. Reporter: Bliss and Ashleigh is the proud mom of Stetson. I wanted to be pregnant. Reporter: The mothers both wanted to be part of the birth process. We felt there has to be a way. Reporter: They turned to Dr. Kathy dudi using reciprocal effortless ivf allowing both women to carry the same baby. I think it opens up, you know, avenues, new choices for same-sex couples. Reporter: The process starts like traditional ivf. Go through the stimulation of her ovaries and the egg harvest. Reporter: Next the eggs were combined with donor sperm but transferred into an invery sell which was blaised in bliss' body for five days for fertilization. The resulting embryos were removed and frozen until Ashleigh's body thanks to injections was ready to carry the baby. That made it special for both of us. We're very grateful for him. Reporter: For "Good morning America," Paula Faris, ABC news, New York. And our thanks to Paula for that. Okay, Jen, how is this technique different from traditional ivf and the risk and benefits? Similar to traditional ivf and anyone can do this. Not just same-sex couples but one woman holds some cells for a few days just inside the body. Then the other woman carries the embryo for nine months in her uterus, so benefits, it's slightly less expensive than traditional ivf and has shown some good pregnancy rates but not totally ready for prime time and need more research and this device has been out for awhile but has been improved. There is a theory being in a woman's more natural body environment can be better but pretty interesting. This is your wheelhouse. That is the emotional significance? I think that's the key. For some people, some couple, some women the drive to be physically involved in a pregnancy is massive and power Tully and this now shows us that we have the technology to make it happen. All right. Jen, thanks so much. You bet.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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