How lactose intolerant people can enjoy real milk again

A2 Milk's CEO Blake Waltrip says many people who think they’re intolerant may just be sensitive to the a1 protein.
3:10 | 06/22/21

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Transcript for How lactose intolerant people can enjoy real milk again
June is national Dary month. Our contributor Alicia Quarles is here to share something she learned in honor of the month. June is national dairy month. Hello there, T.J. I just learned it's national dairy month, but no need to cry over spilled milk. And thank to our sponsor I also learned that many people who think they'relactose intolerant may just be sensitive to the a1 protein in milk. I sat down with the company's U.S. CEO Blake Waltrip to learn more. Take a look. Blake, there's a lot of people out there like me who consider themselves lactose intolerant, but it turns out we could be sensitive to the a1 protein. What does that mean? About 30 million to 50 million Americans report some sort of lactose intolerant symptoms, very few of them get medically tested. They mostly self-diagnose. What we do know is that most of those people are likely intolerant to the a1 protein. That has very similar symptoms to lactose intolerance. Originally all milk in cows were based on the a2 protein. 10,000 years ago there was a genetic mutation that occurred, and that's where the a1 protein came into play, cows are the only mammals in the world that have this a1 protein. All other mammals have the a2 protein. So a2 milk is milk that comes from milk that only produce this a2 protein and no a1. Learn something new every day. Thank you for breaking that down. Your company produces milk that does come from cows, assure the a2 protein than the a1 protein. One third of cows naturally produce only the a2 protein. A third produces the a1 protein. The rest produce a blend of a1 and a2. We DNA test every single cow in the herd, it's the only way you can be sure that you have a2 cows, so we take those a2 cows, we put them in separate pens, and then we test the milk all throughout the supply chain to ensure we have it from cow to we work with our local forms to pay them a premium for the extra work. So somebody like me who's sensitive to a 1, I believe, can we still enjoy milk? Does it taste the same? Absolutely. Most milk you find on the shelf is going to be a blend of a1 and a2, but a2 as we've said comes from cows that produce the a2 protein, it's a natural process. So it's really the original protein in milk. So, a2 milk is 100% real milk that's easier on digestion, allowing millions of Americans to love milk again. So, if you think about it, if you can have all these benefits and it tastes delicious, why wouldn't you try it? By the way, it's available in 23,000 grocery stores across the country. Blake, thank you for the lesson. I've missed milk. I can't wait to try a2. I'm back in the game. Thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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