Groundbreaking chef Floyd Cardoz dies at 59 of coronavirus

ABC News’ chief medical correspondent explains how the novel coronavirus can take a deadly turn and details what more we know about the rate of hospitalizations.
2:21 | 03/26/20

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Transcript for Groundbreaking chef Floyd Cardoz dies at 59 of coronavirus
Now to one of the many faces of this crisis, influential celebrity chef Floyd cardoz passing away from coronavirus just days after writing in his last Instagram post, quote, I was feeling feverish and hence, as a precautionary measure, admitted myself into hospital in New York. It's now raising new questions about this virus. Cardoz's hospitality group telling ABC news he tested positive for coronavirus that same day. The 59-year-old passing away from complications from the virus after traveling abroad. Though it is unclear if he had any underlying medical conditions. Michael? Thank you, Amy. Let's bring in our medical correspondent Dr. Jennifer Ashton joining us from her home. We heard Floyd's story. Sounded like he was getting better, and days later he passes away. What do we know about how this disease progresses? Michael, we don't know that we have to remember it's less than four months old. We know there's a range of symptom otology. Most cases are mild. 80% are mild, but in those that are more severe, it can have an up and down roller coaster-like course just like influenza can. I think that as we learn more, that's why the U.S. Case reports need to be published so we can really understand and see if there's any patterns. And here in the state of new York, governor Cuomo said the rate of hospitalization is going down. So what does that mean for us? Does that mean that the quarantining is working? The separation is working? What does that mean? Well, fir of all, I think we have to be very, very cautious when we interpret his comment even he says it sounds too good to be true. He approached it with a serious degree of skepticism, but the rate is slowing. It's still doubling every four days. It used to be doubling every two days, and the reasons for that, there are several theories. First of all, it could take longer for people who are infected to develop severe disease, and remember when you are dealing with an infectious disease outbreak like this, we are always behind, and when we talk about how behind, usually a two to three-week period. So think of this like we may be in the eye of the storm. All right, doc. Great advice. Don't think it is over. Far from it. Thank you, doc. Robin?

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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