Hiker escapes bear face-off, experts warn encounters may be on the rise

Wildlife guide Evan Matthews caught himself in a stare-down with a black bear in Grand Teton National Park before yelling at the animal and slowly backing away.
2:30 | 04/22/21

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Transcript for Hiker escapes bear face-off, experts warn encounters may be on the rise
That's for sure. We'll try to top it and a jogger's frightening encounter with a bear in grand teton national park managing to stay calm while capturing it on camera. Experts saying he did everything right to stay safe. Kaylee Hartung has more, Kaylee, good morning. Reporter: Hey, good morning, whit. How long do you think ten minutes feels when you're being stalked by a bear? I'm going with too long but here's a textbook example of what to do if you find yourself facing off with one. Hey. Stay back. Hey. Reporter: This morning this wildlife guide thankful his training paid off during this close encounter with a bear. When he started coming at me, everything got heightened and started breathing faster. Heart started beating and realized I needed to take it seriously. You stay there. Good bear. Reporter: Evan Matthews was on a casual run in grand teton national park when he spotted this cinnamon black bear staring him down. I don't care if you're hungry. I'm not your food. I've had plenty of encounters on trail where the bear looked up, acknowledged me and went back to what it was doing, eating berries or whatever, foraging. This one came straight for me and came pretty fast. Reporter: He yelled at the bear while slowly backing away. Wildlife expert Ron Magill says in this tense moment Matthews did everything right. He made sure the bear was aware he was there. He never panicked. Reporter: Experts warn this is the time of year when bears are coming out of hibernation which means there could be more encounters. With less congestion and noise during the pandemic they've been roaming more freely even into a home in southern California and in Romania a bear chasing a skier down the slopes. The worst thing you can do is turn and run. Put your hands up, speak firmly, make yourself look as large as possible and slowly back up to tell the bear, I'm here, I see you but I don't want to have anything to do with you. Never, never ever turn your back and run. Reporter: So most attacks by black bears are defensive reactions to people who get too close and usually the injuries are minor there and, guys, get this, you're more likely to be killed by a bethan a black bear, guys. There you go. News you can use. Thank you so much. I appreciate his trash talk back to the bear. Staying calm in the moment. You don't see the becoming, though. Yeah. Coming up, everyboy, why

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