Officials expect 20 million Americans to be vaccinated for COVID-19 by December

Dean of Brown University's medical school, Dr. Ashish Jha, answers questions about the safety of the vaccine, schools closing and more.
2:48 | 11/22/20

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Officials expect 20 million Americans to be vaccinated for COVID-19 by December
modern vaccines by the end of the year to vaccinate some 20 million people, but there are still plenty of questions to be answered. Joining us now is the Dean of brown university's medical school, Dr. Ashish jha. Thank you so much for being with us. First, let's address a major issue here. People are skeptical. Recent polling suggests that 58% of Americans say they are willing to take the vaccine. Is that enough, and what, if anything, could help change some Good morning, Eva. Thanks for having me on. Yeah. We will want 70% to 80% of Americans ultimately to get vaccinated because that's what's really going to help drive the level of infections way down. So I think what we have to do is explain to people that the process we've used to develop the vaccine has been done with incredible scientific integrity, and I think once people see the data and see their neighbors and friends getting vaccinated, I'm hoping more and more people will get comfortable with the idea of getting themselves and their families vaccinated as well. I want to talk about schools this morning. There's been a lot of debate during this pandemic about closing schools. Last week New York City schools closed. Parents were really upset. They were raising the question, why is it safe for my child to eat indoors, but not in school? Some are pointing to the numbers. Schools have a very low infection rate, but what advice do you have for these parents, and for state officials who are trying to make these decisions? Yeah. So these are hard decisions, but I think the evidence here is really clear, and the evidence is that schools should be open. At least K through eight, there is very little data to suggest there is big spread in those schools. It doesn't make sense to have restaurants and bars open in places, but not have schools open. We should be flipping that, and if you are going to close anything, close bars and restaurants first. Now for those people who are going to be home with their family on thanksthanksgiving, what can you say to help them stay safe when they decide to get together with their family members? So if you are getting together with people who don't live with you, or who are not part of your family bubble, first of all, I think it is -- there is real risk there. There are things you can do. Try to keep your mask on for much of the day. Obviously hard to do that while you're eating. During eating, if you can try to stay separated. One family in one part, and another household eat in another part of the house, keeping windows open. There's no simple, easy way to do it. The best is if you can do it outside, but in places like new England, that's going to be hard. Dr. Jha, we appreciate that advice, and, you know, it's a question a lot of people are dealing with this week, is WHA do we do for Thanksgiving, and that advice is going to be super helpful. Thank you. Dan? Such a wrenching question.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:48","description":"Dean of Brown University's medical school, Dr. Ashish Jha, answers questions about the safety of the vaccine, schools closing and more.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"74344878","title":"Officials expect 20 million Americans to be vaccinated for COVID-19 by December","url":"/GMA/News/video/officials-expect-20-million-americans-vaccinated-covid-19-74344878"}