SCOTUS rules NCAA can't limit student-athlete education-related gifts and benefits

College sports stars react to the Supreme Court's 9-0 ruling against the NCAA, allowing more compensation for its athletes.
2:46 | 06/22/21

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Transcript for SCOTUS rules NCAA can't limit student-athlete education-related gifts and benefits
Now to that victory for college athletes. The U.S. Supreme court unanimously siding with the students ruling the NCAA cannot limit certain opportunities for athletes. ESPN's Ryan Smith joins us with good morning, Ryan. Reporter: Good morning, robin. For decades athletes like sedona prince have been arguing that college sports in some ways has to pay attention to the idea that they have generated so much money and attention for NCAA sports and that they deserve to be compensated more for it. That argument has largely fallen on deaf ears but now the supreme court weighed in and in effect changed the game. That is it. Stanford survives. Reporter: This morning, the stars of college sports reacting to the supreme court's big ruling against the NCAA allowing more compensation for its athletes. This is really important to all student athletes just because no legislation has done this for us. Reporter: In a 9-0 decision the court backing education payments for student athletes, those expanded payments or benefits include paid internships, postgraduate scholarships, tutoring, computers and study abroad. Championship unlike any Reporter: Players from every sport applauding a decision they feel was long overdue. Collegiate sports bringing in an estimated $1 billion a year. Right down the middle of the field. It's touchdown. Reporter: And students have largely not been able to have any piece of the revenue pie. Justice Brett Kavanaugh writing, the NCAA's business model would be flatly illegal in almost any other industry in America. The NCAA is not above the law. I really, really want to push like for us to be treated like adults and to have this freedom of we can now do what we want with our brands. Reporter: The NCAA acknowledging the court's ruling but in a statement obtained by ABC news says it remains free to articulate what are and are not truly educational benefits. Sedona prince part of a separate ongoing lawsuit for the right for student athletes to use their name and likenesses for endorsements. A lawsuit that the NCAA filed a motion to dismiss with no decision being yet made. She says there's more to be done. The supreme court decision was amazing. It was a huge step, but it wasn't enough. Reporter: So now after that supreme court decision, the college sports world turns to that issue of whether student athletes should be compensated and will be compensated for the use of their name, image and likeness. The NCAA says it's committed to supporting the push for those benefit answer hopes to work with congress on a path forward. We will see what happens. Great to see you, Ryan. Following a lot of other

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