Study links irregular sleep patterns to metabolic disorder

Not sticking to a regular bedtime and wake up schedule can put a person at higher risk for obesity, high cholesterol and other metabolic disorders, a study found.
2:43 | 06/06/19

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Transcript for Study links irregular sleep patterns to metabolic disorder
Now to a "Gma" health alert on sleep. A new study from the national institute of health links bad sleep or lack of sleep to a host of health problems like obesity, diabetes, heart disease. Jen Ashton to break it down. Let's bring in the audience. Of everybody in the audience do you go to bed at the same time and get up at the same team every day. How many do that? If that's pretty impressive. We're in good shape. This study followed just over 2,000 people for 6 years and tracked not just how long they slept, we've known that if you don't get enough sleep that's bad for your health. What's new about this study is using sleep trackers they wore on their wrist and actually tracked the variability, what times they went to bed, what times they woke up day to day hour to hour and found if that varied more than one hour over a week, it increased the risk of one of these metabolic risk factors by 27%. Does that matter more than the amount of sleep? It's as important. We don't know if it's more important but talking about things like obesity, high cholesterol, hypertension, high glucose, high blood sugar, waist circumference. Our audience is pretty good. Who is most likely to suffer. Not our audience but higher risk groups, African African, night shift workers and she's who have sleep apnea and young people are never consistent with their sleep because there's too much going on. So if you have an issue with this or think you might have an issue, how about tips. Listen, I can't emphasize enough. Sleep has a pr problem. We look at it like a luxury. It is a medical necessity on par with our food and our fitness. So one interesting thing and I've actually done this myself and you know doctors and nurses are the worst so I'm using a sleep app, it's free called sleep cycle and tracking my sleep day to day over a long period of time and if you take a look at these, this is actually my Friday night, the peaks and valley, the top is when I'm awake. You'll see in the middle of the night people get awakened. Deep sleep across the bottom. The second graph is the interesting thing. This is about a week's period of time. You'll see that Saturday night with my daughter's graduation I went to bed pretty late at 11:30, Sunday night I was excused and went to bed at 9:30 but most of the time I'm within that 10:00 to 10:30 range which is too late on this show but if you follow what times you go to sleep you might be surprised. I learned a lot when I tracked this day to day, week to week, The morning showers are

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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