‘Lion King’ on Broadway makes a big impact in South African village

After her success on Broadway as Rafiki in the iconic musical, Thuli Dumakude went back to her home village of Nkonyane, South Africa, to help create income for families affected by HIV.
5:40 | 01/22/20

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Transcript for ‘Lion King’ on Broadway makes a big impact in South African village
firsthand how a new chapter is open for children at one school. Reporter: For this husband and wife, this moment is about honoring the beauty and culture of South Africa. We look at it as a master dance to represent a culture. these are our people. And we want the world to see that this is who we are. it's important for us to come back and show our people what we are doing overseas. Reporter: Both are current ensemble cast members -- Reporter: In "The lion king" on Broadway. Which has been mesmerizing audiences on stage for more than two decades. With 25 total productions to date in 20 different countries, more than 95 million people have seen the musical. and there's been a conscious effort to stay true to the culture it represents. Since its premiere there have been more than 250 south African cast members in shows around the world. Including this couple who are here tonight raising money for Broadway cares, a nonprofit that works with the theater community to support causes like HIV and AIDS, and family service organizations. "The lion king" has raised over $10 million for Broadway cares. Of that, $5.4 million has literally gone back to about 68 organizations in cities and small towns all across south Africa. Reporter: After the show these intricately beaded animals are sold. But they're more than souvenirs. They are helping change lives more than 8,000 miles away. ABC's parent company Disney invited us to South Africa to meet the women behind these handmade mementos. We traveled to a small rural village called inkonye. I grew up coming here, got married, left, went overseas. Reporter: She left Africa for Broadway, eventually landing the role in the late '90s. She was inspired by the work Broadway cares was doing, and it was her idea to connect her vith this village where her family was from. I remember when I first came, oh my god, how do people live like this? Reporter: No electricity, no running water. I used to sleep on the floor. Within these homes, there are some people without beds? Absolutely. Reporter: She founded her own organization, creating jobs for these women. They didn't want handouts, they wanted a job. They'd bead carved animals sold on Broadway. Every purchase you make, you're feeding a child in southern Africa. You may never get there, but the dollars that you're spending on this are feeding somebody. Could you have imagined seeing your dream become this No. What does it make you feel like? I'm afraid to look deep into the emotional side of it. I haven't lived -- I haven't been in their shoes. But I have been exposed. I've been exposed to the difficulties that they go through. They don't complain. Oh god, I'm going to cry. They don't complain. If it's not doable, it's not doable. You know, just have to live with it. Reporter: In addition to helping create jobs, Broadway cares also donated $10,000 to the village to build its first preschool. The school is very necessary because it helps parents in this community and grandparents work, so that they can have jobs. Now we're here and you see the money, but it must inspire you to think there's so much more. There is really so much more to do. This is just a step. Just standing here, just looking, we can help with this, we can help with that. You know. When you're around something like this, you can't think but what you can improve and make it better for the kids. You know, for the community. Reporter: They show me inside. Where we show them "The lion king." The kids here don't have TVs, let alone know what "The lion king" is. eir laughter lights up the room. I think they will remember this. Oh, yes. Definitely will remember this. That's why you have them say, play the game! The full girl again. It is a full girl. Reporter: Ginger zee, south Africa. And next, the best friend,

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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