How toilet paper factory employees are working through COVID-19 demands

In the Box Elder, Utah, Charmin factory, these front-line workers continue to produce toilet paper for millions of customers across the country 24 hours a day, seven days a week.
4:53 | 07/08/20

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Transcript for How toilet paper factory employees are working through COVID-19 demands
Reporter: Looks like we're in a canyon surrounded by paper towels. One item no one can find is toilet paper. Reporter: As the covid-19 cases and specter of staying at home orders came to a head, Americans became tp orders. First thing that went through my mind, we have to get to Costco and get as much toilet paper as we can. Reporter: U.S. Toilet paper companies cranked out 700,000 to of product alone in March. When you think you're going to be locked in your house for a long time, there are certain things you want, there was nothing irrational about people wanting to make sure they had a stock of toilet paper. Reporter: It's linked to a psychological concept of scarcity. They see something running out and they run out to buy it for themselves, making the product disappear faster than suppliers can make it. Now that case rise around the country, we go behind the scenes with a tp pepper. Empty shelves, it's all here. We're getting it out as fast as we can. Reporter: Box elder, Utah, a town with just over 55,000 residents, producing toilet paper for millions at this Procter & gamble factory, taking no chances. We just came in the building. We had to use hand sanitizer, what do we do next? Everyone coming inside has to have their temperature scanned every day. Reporter: I have to get mine taken. We'll get yours as well. Reporter: We're good to go. Have you gotten used to it yet? Every day, it's a bit of an adventure, you forget that it's there, but the breath of fresh air at the end of the day when you take the mask off reminds you how not-normal it is. Reporter: We hit the factory floor in may where they are rolling out rolls of toilet paper and paper towels, 24 hours a day seven days a week. That's intended to keep people isolated and separated. If someone gets sick. Reporter: Here is where it toilet paper begins as a dry paper pulp. This is the beginning of the process really, right? Yes. Reporter: Think of it basically like a big blender. This is it, huh? Yeah. Reporter: Kind of feels like wet toilet paper. Exactly. Reporter: It is pressed and dried into super size rolls that look like giant movie props. I feel a little like "Ant man." They're huge. We'll unroll big rolls and cut them into bounty or Charmin. We convert big rolls into the finished product. Reporter: So all of that paper has gone from those giant rolls and finally now been cut into something we recognize. Kay devo is a technician here and has made product for 20 years, but the lockdown lifestyle look and feels completely different. There's a whole different process just for getting in the building. That process makes me feel safe at work. It is a process to go through, but I feel we spend the time sanitizing, looking out for each other, we're distancing. Reporter: Yes. So that in it is a good Reporter: The pace to produce is non-stop. Jared Kent helps keep everything running. We'll take two of those rolls and bring them together, make them together, and then that makes it our two-ply product. Reporter: That's how you make two-ply toilet paper. Yes, exactly. Reporter: Competition in the toilet paper industry is fierce, even as companies are racing to roll out more product, Procter & gamble told us they slowed down our machines when we arrived so their competitors won't know just how fast they can produce. Did you ever think in a pandemic toilet paper was going to be the one thing people couldn't get? Never in my wildest dreams. Reporter: How does it feel to be replenishing the supply? Feels good. We're doing our part. Reporter: If covid numbers continue to spike, toilet paper companies will just have to roll with it. This can always come back. Whether it's on medicines, staple paper goods, a whole bunch of things that are storable and people think they are going to need or they're anticipating there's going to be high demand for. Reporter: Clayton Sandell, in box elder, Utah.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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