Mothers, sons separated by former administration's immigration policy reunited

Mabel and her sons, Minno and Erik, and Sandra Ortiz and her son, Bryan, had been separated for more than three years because of the zero-tolerance immigration policy.
2:30 | 05/05/21

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Mothers, sons separated by former administration's immigration policy reunited
And we turn next here this evening to the emotional reunions, the first migrant families separated under the trump administration's zero tolerance policy to now be reunited under president Biden. The mother from Honduras surprising her two sons. She had not seen them in three another mother back with her son after being pulled apart at the border. And the question tonight, what happens now after these reunions? Here's our chief white house correspondent Cecilia Vega. Reporter: Tonight, 3 years, 7 months and 13 days after this mother last saw her sons, they are a family reunited. They're among the thousands of parents and children forcibly separated under the trump administration's zero tolerance immigration policy. Mom, Mabel, deported back to Honduras, the very country she fled because of violence. Her sons, mino and Erik, 13 and 15 at the time, staying behind with family in the U.S. Overnight at a family gathering in Philadelphia, they had no idea their mom was coming in until she walked in the door. "I love you," she tells them. Their grandmother in disbelief. Advocates have spent years trying to find parents in Mexico and Central America. The Biden administration says the trump white house left them with little to know information about many of the families. There are still more than 400 children whose parents have yet to be located. Sandra Ortiz among the four families this week reunited under the Biden administration. She hugged her son Bryan for the first time in more than three years. Deported to Mexico without him, Bryan stayed with older siblings in California, learning English, graduating high school a year early. It feels like a dream. Reporter: The administration says more families will be reunited soon, but for now, these are tears of joy. This mother saying, "I love you my beautiful son." Cecilia, these are emotional scenes, mothers reunited with their children. And I know a lot of people watching are going to wonder what happens now to these families after the reunions. Reporter: Yeah, David, four reunions are happening this week. They're all going to receive temporary protected status for humanitarian reasons, but temporary. They can stay in the country legally temporarily. Advocates are calling for permanent legal protection given all the trauma they've endured. David, this is hardly the end of the story for these families. All right, and Cecilia Vega, we know you'll continue to follow this as you have for a long time now and we appreciate

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:30","description":"Mabel and her sons, Minno and Erik, and Sandra Ortiz and her son, Bryan, had been separated for more than three years because of the zero-tolerance immigration policy.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/WNT","id":"77518398","title":"Mothers, sons separated by former administration's immigration policy reunited","url":"/WNT/video/mothers-reunited-sons-years-separated-administrations-immigration-policy-77518398"}