Trump and first lady to visit Pittsburgh after synagogue attack

The White House said the president didn't see a need to tone down his rhetoric as he blamed the media for causing anger in the U.S.
2:33 | 10/29/18

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Trump and first lady to visit Pittsburgh after synagogue attack
And in the wake of the massacre at the synagogue, president trump is now saying the media is the true enemy of the people. He plans to visit Pittsburgh and tonight, members of that community are reacting. Here's ABC's chief white house correspondent Jonathan Karl. Reporter: As the president and first lady prepare to visit Pittsburgh, the white house is making it clear the president does not see a need to tone down his rhetoric. Does he have any concern at all that his words could inspire or provoke troubled people to do awful things? Certainly, the president wants, in moments where our country is hurting like we've seen in the last several days, find ways to bring our country together, and we've seen him do exactly that. However, the president is going to continue to draw contrasts. Reporter: In his very first comments after the shooting, the president condemned what he called an act of hate, but he did not mention the victims. Instead, he suggested armed guards at the synagogue could have prevented the killing. If they had protection inside, the results would have been far better. Reporter: The mayor of Pittsburgh firmly disagreed. I don't think that the answer to this problem is solved by having our synagogues, mosques, and churches filled with armed guards. We should try to stop irrational behavior from happening at the forefront. Reporter: Later, the president struck a somber tone. Our nation and the world are shocked and stunned by the grief. Reporter: But today, the president blamed the news media for causing anger in the country, tweeting this morning that the press is, quote, the true enemy of the people. When you say he's trying to unite the country, why is he out there making these attacks? Jonathan, the very first thing that the president did was condemn the attacks both in Pittsburgh and the pipe bombs. The very first thing the media did was blame the president for these ridiculous acts. And Jon Karl with us live tonight from the white house. And Jon, as you reported, the president and the first lady are heading to Pittsburgh tomorrow. I know there are many who do feel strongly about this in that community. They're weighing in tonight? Reporter: Well, there's one Progressive jewish group in Pittsburgh saying the president is not welcome until he fully denounces white supremacy. In response to that, the white house said the president has repeatedly denounced bigotry and racism in all forms. And Sarah Sanders said the president is going to Pittsburgh to show support for the jewish community. And she pointed out that the rabbi from the tree of life synagogue has said that he is welcome. David? Jon Karl with us again tonight.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"2:33","description":"The White House said the president didn't see a need to tone down his rhetoric as he blamed the media for causing anger in the U.S.","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/WNT","id":"58837706","title":"Trump and first lady to visit Pittsburgh after synagogue attack","url":"/WNT/video/trump-lady-visit-pittsburgh-synagogue-attack-58837706"}