Midterm elections and the split ticket voting

A look at three states likely to vote against party lines in electing their next governor.
2:00 | 10/19/18

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Transcript for Midterm elections and the split ticket voting
In 201822. States will elect to both to senator. And a governor and in our polarized political environmental. Most states will vote on party lines but three of those states seem likely to splinter tickets. Massachusetts Maryland and Vermont so why is pets welcome much more than for members of congress support for some governors can defy the State's partisanship. In the first part of 2018. Republican governors. In the democratic leaning states Charlie speaker of Massachusetts Mary Hogan of Maryland and Phil Scott of Vermont. Ranked first second and fourth respectively. In popularity. Among the governor's nationally and although Scott has taken quite a hit in popularity recently and is no longer in the top ten. One possible explanation we. For why these states split their tickets is the elasticity of their voters Massachusetts and Vermont pull rank in the top ten of elastic states. Meaning that they have a lot of swing voters. Were willing to cross party lines and even though Massachusetts and Vermont are pretty Blue States. In an elastic state like Vermont issues and the general political environment can matter hold off to a for example governor stock took a cane in his popularity after he signed sweeping gun control legislation in April. Which seems now to have lasted into our. It may even hurt his chances at the ballot box in November that he's still a strong favorite to win re election. Maryland doesn't have as many elastic. But one thing that all these candidates have in common is that their popular incumbents and look likely to be rewarded. The majority of states will still a lack of senator and governor from the same party in 2000. But the states that don't aren't necessarily out for governors' races. Voters are still often athletes and their tech.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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