Genealogist on Finding Lost Family: 'My First Case Was My Own'

As an adoptee herself, Pam Slaton tells ABC News' "20/20" what happened she went searching for answers.
3:39 | 12/11/15

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Transcript for Genealogist on Finding Lost Family: 'My First Case Was My Own'
My name is Pam Slaton and an investigative team geologist. What I do. My first case was my own my adoptive family it was my family. Yet I was always aware as a young girl that I wanted to find this mystery woman that gave me life. I haven't been back here and almost twenty years so it's strange to me because my town is changed. I still consider this my home. But it all so it's six evoking a lot of emotions for me because my parents and my brother. Are all to see so. This takes me back to a place. Having family again. And it means lots me to be here. We're about to get on the seven chain which is something that I did when I was six years old it was the first time. I attempted to sex for my birth mother. LA say woven on the plane and I was an advocate and she looked like me. And I notice you look at me and I was looking at car and she would have been it's appropriate for my birth mother. How to stop myself from getting up and saying hey. And tapping into the top ranked option anyway the play's villain in time and something kept me in my feet back. I think a lot of adopting those very bad news these women that look like you and then you wonder can we be related and you know the ironic thing is elevate your case is. I still a lot of parallels of people do live Yates do you stop in the same place. A lot of things go on that you couldn't cross. Finding your birth families like reading a novel over and over again. And then all of a sudden the characters from the book become like people. Unfortunately. Once I got into the agency and I thought it would be the big day that I could potentially find my birth mother. I was told that I was too young because I was sixteen. They were prohibited. And sang information with me and time is eighteen years old. Is crossing to me at the time. But it also fueled a fire in me Morse and I had ever had before. Being the relentless style that I down. Two years later when I was eighteen I went back and finally started getting some of those scraps of my own story. I know when I guess. Maybe without even realizing medium reliving my owns or any. Every time I take on a new case.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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