How to keep your kids safe when they play multiplayer games

"GMA" invited parents to listen in to their children's headsets as they played video games to raise awareness about gaming with strangers.
4:22 | 09/09/19

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Transcript for How to keep your kids safe when they play multiplayer games
We're going to turn now to the series "Cracking the kid code." We learn about video games so many kids are connecting to persons online that they may not know. And parents may not know as T.J. Is back. Parents would say this is where my child is the safest at home under my roof where I can see that child. The thing is with these games, multiplay games you're actually letting strangers have instant access to your child with online games. They could actually be talking to your child and you have no idea who's on the other end of that line. Reporter: We see our kids in the battles, but most of the time we don't hear the conversations they're having while playing popular video games. And some of the talk on the other end -- Is alarming. "Gma" teamed up with south Carolina attorney Alan Wilson for eye avid Yo game experiment that includes a group of 11 year Olds including Wilson's own son. We plugged into their headsets letting us in on their conversations. The kids play popular fortnite and apex legends. Both games that can team your kid up with 1 to 100 strangers. In a matter of minutes into the fortnite game, the profanity starts, And the language is so inappropriate, we can't play it. His dad Derrick is watching from across the room and was shocked. What was that reaction I was seeing on your face? Just fear. And I can't believe that's going on. Reporter: Just how common is this? Toxicity with gaming seem to go hand in hand. People feel they can do what they want. Reporter: Attorney Alan Wilson says there's something worse than foul language. He's created a task force educating parents and kids about gaming with strangers. That's where the predators are going. Reporter: In January, authorities arrest a 44-year-old Florida man who used fortnite to communicate with at least 20 minors and eventually lured at least one of them to meet up. He was charged with unlawful sex with a minor and child pornography. Trash talk is very big in some of these games. So that's a concern. Reporter: We showed what we found to Donna wright-hughes, an organization of enough is enough. There could easily have been a predator in there. But they're not going to expose themselves until they've got a relationship with the child that they can take private. Tically, that's the way it happens. Reporter: The entertainment association tells us we encourage parents to play with their kids an utilize the parental controls to ensure an appropriate experience. But Wilson says if parents are worried about their kids' safety, don't take the devices away from them, instead, teach them how to be safe. We've got to keep our kids while they're young because you're not there with them all the time. And again, due diligence, parents hear this and think I've got to take this away from my don't do that. They go down the street and do it. Show a dad how to do it. All right. Dad, parentaltools.org. Hear that, folks? Parentaltools.org. This site is going to pop up. To the right, restriction click on that. Your kid probably has one of those devices. Click on whichever one you have. Right there, step-by-step instructions on how to get parental control. Depending on your devices go right there. We've been talking a lot about fortnite. You see that there. Filter language. It will take the language away. So the kid can't see or hear it. Voice check, you have that option. You can turn that sucker off. You can still play with people, but you just can't communicate with them. We've been talking about this over the last couple of years. It's important to continue to reiterate. It's that easy. Parentaltools.org. Do it, folks. Thank you. And we've got duchess

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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