Author inspires readers to perform small acts of kindness

Amy Wolff started a yard sign movement that spread worldwide as she helped to combat depression and high rates of suicide by letting people know others care.
2:51 | 04/07/21

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Transcript for Author inspires readers to perform small acts of kindness
Oregon family spreading sunshine in an unusual way, leaving signs of hope everywhere they can, the practice is really catching on so let's take a look. In the spring of 2017, I was sitting in my friend's house, when one of them mentioned the suicide rate in our small town in Oregon, so a few weeks later, my young daughters, my husband, and myself stuffed 20 yard signs with kind words on them around our town, words like you are worthy of love, don't give up, your mistakes don't define you, and very quickly it blew up into a grassroots movement of spreading hopeful messages all around the world. The day we put the signs out, I was putting them in my trunk, and I thought to myself this is the stupidest idea I have ever had, this will help nobody but I was desperate to do something, a couple of years ago, a woman reached out to us and E.R. Nurse out of Utah, she received permission from the institution to put signs along the driveway heading into the hospital. What she didn't anticipate is that a little while later, they would be driving by those signs admitting their own son to the hospital for self-harm ideation. And that's like us, one day we're givers and spreaders of love, and the next day, we're the ones desperate for it. I was asked by a literary agent who heard our story, collect those stories, put them in a book. This book is a collection of stories of people struggling, trying to find hope for themselves, and stories of really imperfect compassionate people, trying to do something good in the world. This book is a rallying cry. We need each other. Collective hope and compassionate love. There have been personal seasons for me where I didn't feel hope. My marriage was really difficult and rocky. And I remember calling my mom and she told me, Amy, even if you don't have the strength to hold on to hope yourself, I'll hold on to it for you until you can. And the people around us, who can say, I know you don't have hope for this, I know it hurts to hope, but let me hold on to it for you, until you find it strength to hold on to it yourself. You have something to offer. That's the main message of the book. I hope it's inspiring. I hope it's challenging. And I hope it stirs up new ideas of how to reach your community. I love this. The power of one voice, the power of one sign. It doesn't take a big effort. Just a small one. I am really, she has little nuggets in here that are great, so congrats on this. I'm actually going to apply this to the show this week. Can't wait for my small act of kindness. Just ahead. It wasn't that funny. Eddie, it was not that funny.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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