How military vets and retired athletes are supporting each other with the MVP program

Sportswriter Jay Glazer founded the program to help veterans transition back into civilian life.
2:57 | 11/09/18

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Transcript for How military vets and retired athletes are supporting each other with the MVP program
With veterans day on Sunday, you know, we get ready to celebrate our nation's heroes I thought it would be nice to take my pal, Sara Haines, to a place that is close to my heart. I'm glad you came along. Now it's close to my heart as well. You took me to an amazing place called MVP where veterans and athletes come together to support each other and it blew me away. Plus, we got the chance to surprise one very special veteran. ?????? sure, this may look like some high intensity workout class. But here at l.a.'s unbreakable performance center, this is a room filled with warriors. Thanks to the gym's owner sports reporter Jay glazer military veterans and retired athletes are coming together to support each other in a special program called MVP. What does it stand for. Merging vets and players. Triering to take ex-combat vets and started with NFL players but now spanning all sports. Need to realize the uniform doesn't define you. Reporter: With a little help from some of his pals Jay created a workout. I signed a lease for a new apartment. Two bedrooms. One person. Reporter: Giving these heroes and athletes a new purpose in life. People in here who came in who were homeless and came in who now have homes because of MVP and people had attempted suicide who now said not an option and pulled their brothers and sisters out of similar things. It's so open and people come and say things they had never told anybody but they're sharing with a group because they feel so comfortable in this group and they feel so supported. Reporter: One of MVP's superstars, Denver Morris, a retired marine who battled homeless this is and even attempted suicide is thriving as the program's outreach director. He doesn't even own a car but ha doesn't him from taking the bus all over Los Angeles to help dozens of veterans who have fallen on tough time. Went from the bottom. Now I'm here, so, you know, that's kind of the simplest way of saying it. Reporter: Little does he know the MVP team has one big surprise for him. His very own car. Everybody, stand up. Come on, big boy. Got a little surprise. Got a little surprise. Yeah. Check out your new ride. So moving and so special to see this. This is one of those stories that affection you forever. What a special group. When he got the car he said it's going to help so many of us. He didn't look at it as just for something for him but all of those guys that will benefit from it and we'll have much more about MVP later on "Gma day" and spotlight some incredible inspiring veterans tonight on "Nightline" so make sure you check that out as well.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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