NASA is setting its sights on returning to the moon

Rob Marciano takes an exclusive, behind-the-scenes look at the facility that's helping us understand more about what's beyond our world.
2:31 | 01/25/20

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Transcript for NASA is setting its sights on returning to the moon
solar system. Rob is in Denver, Colorado, with an exclusive behind the scenes look at the facility that is helping us understand more about what's beyond our world as well as our own planet. Good morning, rob. Reporter: Good morning, Eva. Learning lots and lots about, yes, our world and the worlds beyond. We are inside mission control here at lockheed martin which has been one of nasa's main space contractors for decades since the launch of viking in 1976. They've been a part of every u.s.-based launch to Mars. Those are missions that have been successful and now have four that are happening this morning. All part of seven interplanetary missions being flown from this room right now. Three, two, one. Reporter: Rocket launches are spectacular. Liftoff. Reporter: But it's what that supersonic vehicle is carrying that matters most and many of the spacecraft that orbit the Earth and explore outer space are built here in Colorado at lockheed martin space. Interplanetary missions like Juneau buzzing around Jupiter. Where we are right now is the primary mission control for seven nasa missions that are exploring our solar system. Reporter: Building the newest high definition weather satellites to keep you safe from the storm. You're about to see a weather satellite up close. This is the man that puts this one together. A.J., what do we have to do to get in the room? Gowned up, full suit. Eyes exposed. The bunny suit. The bunny suit. It's going to look ridiculous but let's go. Feel super cute. These satellites orbit at the same rate the Earth spins. It's like putting a camera on a tripod. This is what we see from space. In order to view this area, we have to be completely pristine. Why is it so important we be clean when we go into the clean room? Yeah, the reason why is we have six instruments, five of those have sensors on them that require us to have a specific cleanliness level. Obviously you don't want a lens with a big smudge on it. Right. That would be horrible if you had a dirty windshield and no ability to clean it. Right. Reporter: The next gps technology is being built here in part to help your smartphone get you where you need to go. Using it to navigate. For financial transactions, farmers are using it to wok work their land. Reporter: They're testing the capsule that will carry the next American crew to the moon. The design of that capsule is being tested in the building over. Incredible facility.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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