National Geographic celebrates the lives of women in new book

Editor-in-chief Susan Goldberg talks about images of women from the last 130 years and featuring them in the book "Women: The National Geographic Image Collection."
6:12 | 10/22/19

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Transcript for National Geographic celebrates the lives of women in new book
can see, we are surrounded by amazing images from national geographic magazine. This morning and if you're noticing, they are all photos of women. National geographic has compiled hundreds of images that celebrate, celebrate the lives of women over the last 130 years and put them in a beautiful new book called "Women: The national geographic image collection," and Susan Goldberg, the editor in chief of national geographic is here to talk all about it. Lovely to see you. Thank you for this. It is stunning. It is absolutely stunning. Why now? Why now? We're having a moment of female empowerment around the globe with women demanding and getting eir rights. Everywhere you look and we're on about the 100th anniversary of women getting the right to vote right here in the United States so it seemed like the perfect time to really look at how women have been depicted over the last three centuries. It's wonderful how you just -- when you look at it, Susan, the narrative arc when you see where women are then, where we were then, where we are now. Let's start from 100 years ago. Pictures, how they were depicted. You start out with women depicted in such traditional roles, women with babies and, you know, taking care of children. You know, then we have a long period where women are beautiful objects, just gorgeous, you know, displays of themselves, just beautiful like this picture from the 1930s. That continues in the '40s and '50s like that that we were on display so to speak. Especially in the '40s and '50s, long period of smiley pictures of women almost used as props showing off objects or -- What is she showing off. I believe that's a trout. Don't you go fishing like that. Exactly. You know, but then as we move into the '60s and especially into the '70s, we start seeing images that look a lot more like real life. There is a beautiful picture from the early '70s of Vermont of this woman sitting on this porch looking very pensive, maybe she's just looking for her kids or she's just come out of the kitchen, but it's a very much more real image. Yeah, real life images in that period. Well, it did get real and then it gets even more real. We start getting real emotion in images. We're seeing pictures of rage, there's a very frightening picture really out of Jerusalem from the early 1980s, you know, so real emotions and also seeing women doing things that before only men had been seen doing like working, we have an image out of India of these brick haulers, so this is taken in about 2000 and a beautiful image from Kenya from one of the only female gamekeepers. So we've got women doing all of these things and what's changed is not only are women doing different things, but also who is taking the pictures? They're now taking the pictures. You have an illustration of that and you also bring in women currently of today. Oh, absolutely. And we have a lot more women photographers and I think it's fair to say that women and men often view the world through different lenses and so female photographers might see the world differently. We have a wonderful picture of women getting educated. This is from 2017. It's Spellman college. You can see -- The joy. The gorgeous young woman with her aunt and mom on graduation You can see the pride too. Such a happy, happy, wonderful picture. And I also love that women are now even being pictured as warriors, as the warriors we know that women really are. But now we're seeing that. We've got this amazing picture. This is corporal Gabrielle green in the Marines and you can see she's training for deployment. She is pretty much slung a 200-pound man over her shoulder walking up a steep ramp and that tattoo says the fire inside me burns brighter than the fire around me. Oh, wow. Which is an amazing message. A woman photographer as well who took that picture. Absolutely. This is linsey adairio who is one of our combat photographers. One of the best in the world. And the magazine itself is going to have on the cover -- Absolutely. We are so excited about the November issue of our magazine. It is the first in our 131-year history that is all written and photographed by women contributors. Oh, my goodness. First time ever. That's beautiful. You also in the book, you talk to so many incredible women, all walks of life, politicians, athletes, celebrities. Was there a common thread through them all and advice you give to young women here. Yeah, well, the first thing I noticed made me sad because here you had as you say some of the most amazing women in the world and so many of them talked about the lack of confidence that they had suffered themselves or that they see other women really working on. When I talked to Oprah Winfrey she called the disease that so many women are afflicted with. Nancy Pelosi said she didn't think women could reach their full potential without feeling that self-confidence. Even Jennifer dudna, a breakthrough scientist and amazing woman talked about how she didn't think she had what it took to really do great science. So that was -- I thought that was a little bit sobering. On the other hand what I loved was the advice that these women were giving to younger women. What's that. It was empowering, it was go be yourself. Melinda Gates said fitting in is overrated. Nancy Pelosi said, know your power. I mean, Alex Morgan said don't be discouraged on your journey. It was all about knowing who you were, going for your ambition and just living your own life. We can all hear that. An absolute delight. It is an absolutely beautiful book. And the November issue of "National geographic" online and on newsstands October 29th and the book is available now wherever books are sold. Thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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