Report calls for parents to emphasize character during college admissions process

A new report from a Harvard-backed group emphasizes the need for parents to have their children focus on their character and less on achievement as they apply to colleges.
2:53 | 03/18/19

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Transcript for Report calls for parents to emphasize character during college admissions process
the "Gma" cover story. In the wake of the college admissions cheating scandal, a new report from Harvard shows values parents and students should focus on. This new study says colleges need to reform the admissions process. But more importantly, the process needs to put a higher priority on ethical character. And the onus to do that false on parents and high schools. This morning, a timely new report released by a Harvard university based group called making caring common. Which urges parents and high schools to put ethical character at the center of the college admissions process. All these things that parents are doing to get into the selective college is not in tend going the make their kids happier. What will make their kids happier is if they end up in colleges where they're likely to really be engaged and fit and thrive. Reporter: The report focuses in part on how middle and upper income families prioritize achievement over a child's character. Parents think they're communicating this message that what happens's most important is you're a good person. Kids are hearing, achievement, achievement, achievement. Reporter: The Harvard report etch sizes the small number of kids who get into elite universities. Saying the biggest problem in college a migs is that huge numbers of young people, especially low income and first generation students struggle to access or can't afford college or land in colleges that are not committed to their success. It's hard to know where you want to go and how you're going get there if you don't have people around you guiding you in a sense to tell you how to do that. Reporter: Vincent and Nicholas represent the kid who is are just trying to make it into college. I, personally, can't afford the S.A.T. Tutor. Or, that classes. And the S.A.T. Is like $50. Most people can't afford the I was able to get a laptop this year. Prior to that, I didn't have a laptop. I wasn't able to, like, get any of my school work done. Reporter: Both student credit their success to the evac movement. An organization aiming to help young black men in their area. Now, nuk las and vuns have their sights set on Florida state university, where, if accepted, they would be the first in their family to attend college. We asked if the boys would room together if accepted into the same school? They enthusiastically said yes. You get a sense of how inequitable the process is. We need to continue the shed the light. More light on this so people can have a full understanding of what they're up against. That is a fixable problem. It is. It's not where you go. It's what you do after you get out of whatever school you're in. You're not going the make your success by the college you go to.

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