States struggle to control COVID-19 cases as testing proves problematic

New guidelines from the CDC say patients who have recovered from COVID-19 don't need to quarantine or get tested for up to three months.
3:58 | 08/15/20

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Transcript for States struggle to control COVID-19 cases as testing proves problematic
with the latest on the pandemic. While the number of covid patients in America's hospitals is falling, the number of daily deaths is unfortunately rising with the passing of 1,204 of our fellow Americans reported in just the latest 24 hours. The fda is now warning against the reliance on rapid tests currently being used at the white house and for pro sports leagues. The agency raising concerns rapid tests are less sensitive than other tests. The new guidelines say people without covid-19 symptoms and who aren't known to have been exposed to the virus shouldn't necessarily be screened with those rapid tests. We're seeing the impact on schools and colleges. Colombia university announcing it's moving all classes online because of coronavirus constraints. The news comes as Villanova warns its students after a video made the rounds online showing a large crowd, you see it there, gathering and that was on campus. The university president saying students will be sent home if they don't abide by safety guidelines. ABC's Trevor Ault is at a testing facility in the bronx with the very latest. Trevor, good morning. Reporter: Good morning, whit. So, around the world there has been a million new confirmed covid-19 cases in just the past four days. Now, here in the U.S. Cases are declining slightly but in many areas there is still carnage, four states hit record hospitalizations this week. Five of them hit record deaths and thousands are still enduring massive wait times just to get tested. This morning, the onslaught of new covid-19 cases is slowing slightly but still slamming several areas. We just can't hire enough people fast enough to keep up with the demand. Reporter: Testing delays continue to be a rampant problem. In Rhode Island patients like Tressie Seymour are waiting ten hour force a test. Now it's going on almost seven hours that I've been in my car waiting to get tested. Reporter: In Fulton county nonprofit company core founded by actor Sean Penn is giving millions of dollars to aggressively expand testing for the most vulnerable populations. This partnership and the integrated services that are able to be provided as a result sets an example not only for the state of Georgia but for the rest of the nation. Reporter: New findings from Emory university highlight the pandemic's staggering racial and ethnic disparities. In predominantly black communities infection rates are three times higher and death rates are six times higher when compared to predominantly white communities. People say we're all in the same boat. I tell people, yeah, no, we're not. Some people are on a dingy, other people are in a yacht. Reporter: Medical workers are learning more about the virus every day. New guidelines from the CDC say patients who have recovered from covid-19 don't need to quarantine or get retested for up to three months. While in Texas, doctors say a baby who tested positive the day she was born likely contracted the virus in the womb. As some schools and colleges return, the university of north Carolina has reported clusters of at least five positive cases in two different residence halls. While the Florida high school athletic association has voted to allow its schools to start fall sports later this month against the recommendations from medical experts, 68-year-old Judy stokes has heart disease and high blood pressure, but she volunteered for the modern vaccine trial anyway saying she was inspired by her son Ian volunteering too. I really wasn't sure if they would want me but it turns out that's exactly who they wanted. They wanted a diverse group of people and those more vulnerable. Reporter: And here in new York City we're still a long way from fully re-opening but later this month, August 24th, museums and cultural centers can finally re-open and the met, the nation's largest art museum, will re-open the 29th. Dan. A lot of people excited about that. Trevor, thank you very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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