Testing the dangers of hot cars on 'GMA'

With a heatwave set to hit this weekend, ABC News' Gio Benitez demonstrates how high temperatures can rise in enclosed cars in the heat, even over short periods of time.
1:57 | 07/19/19

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Transcript for Testing the dangers of hot cars on 'GMA'
We turn to that hot car experiment we've been telling but all morning live on "Gma" with nearly 200 million people facing the extreme heat as we head into the weekend. Gio Benitez is seeing just how dangerous a hot car can get. So earlier this morning, as you can see here, he got into a hot windows up, no ac to show us what can happen. Yeah, been there for about 45 minutes keeping an eye on you, we see you sweating quite a bit an know a paramedic is helping you out. First things first how are you feeling? So I got to tell you my heart is racing a little bit. My mind isn't exactly clear right now and I'm definitely sweating. I mean you can see that much. Listen, we started with this 83 degrees inside this car. That's when we started. We're at 96 degrees inside this car right now that was just 45 minutes and we just took my body temperature right there. It was 100.8. 100.5 is deadly for kids, Joe, thank you so much for keeping me safe. I'm going to step outside here because what I want to show you is that -- look at the sky because this is a cloudy day. This is what we're talking that's what we saw in a cloudy day and this could just happen when you have a kid down there in the backseat. You're talking about a body temperature rising three to five times faster than adults. That is exactly why we're talking about this. So important. There is new technology that can protect kids as you wipe the sweat away. Yeah, yeah, there is. And this is a technology called sense a life. This is a pad here. It's got a detection device inside. You put this pad under the watch what happens when we open. Look at this. Well, this would have told you that -- it would have alerted you would have had a child in the backseat and so that is what happens with this sense a life program. You end up having in inside the car. You took one for the team. Get inside to the ac.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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