New twist in decades-long case of missing girl in Rome

Vatican investigators opened the tombs of two 19th-century princesses after an anonymous tip in the case of Emanuela Orlando, who vanished in 1983 at age 15.
2:59 | 07/15/19

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Transcript for New twist in decades-long case of missing girl in Rome
We are back with that growing mystery at the Vatican. Officials there following new leads and making a puzzling new discovery as they try to find out what happened to a 15-year-old girl who vanished nearly four decades ago. Ian Pannell is just outside Vatican City with the very latest. Good morning, Ian. Reporter: Yeah, good morning, Amy. That's right. A new twist in one of Italy's longest standing unsolved mysteries. A teenage girl, the daughter of a Vatican employee, who vanished from here 36 years ago and this morning, the family of that young girl again searching desperately for answers. Vatican security is impenetrable. Reporter: It reads like a story straight from the pages of a mystery. Open the doors and tell the world the truth. Reporter: This morning Vatican investigators are searching for the truth behind the decades old disappearance of 15-year-old emanuela Orlandi. The girl disappeared after leaving her home in the Vatican City to take music lessons in Rome. She was never seen again. Any time there is a mystery, a potential scandal with any hint of a Vatican involvement, it's going to take on a life of its own. Reporter: Last week, Vatican investigators acting on a possible break in the case prying open the tombs of two 19th century German princesses, Orlandi's family had received an anonymous tip that her remains might be buried here where an angel was pointing. Her brother watching on anxiously but both tombs empty. It was completely empty, he told reporters, absolutely nothing. The excavation occurring in this cemetery on the grounds of the pontifical teutonic college. Inside Vatican City just next door to St. Peter's basilica. Those empty tombs priming officials to investigate inside the college where over the weekend they made a new discovery. Two containers believed to hold human remains, bones found under a stone slab leaving some to wonder if one of those remains could belong to Orlandi. When the tombs turned up empty the Vatican recalled there was structural work on the cemetery as recently as the 1960s and '70s and perhaps the bones had been moved during that work. Reporter: Now it's been sealed off. Investigators need to search that area and discover do the bones belong to Orlandi, the two German princesses or someone for decades the Vatican has been accused of covering up evidence of the young girl's mysterious disappearance but officials have always denied any involvement or knowledge of it. A spokesperson for the Vatican is saying they've always shown attention to the suffering of the family and it was in that light that they agreeded to recent excavations. It was at the family's request. This isn't the first time tombs and burial sites have been unearthed in the search for emanuela and this morning this remains a mystery unsolved. We have "Play of the day." What happens when wimbledon

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