How limes and other citrus fruits can cause burns this summer

With summer on the way, "GMA" brings a timely warning about how chemical reactions between certain citrus fruits and the skin can cause blisters and burns when exposed to the sun.
3:09 | 05/24/19

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Transcript for How limes and other citrus fruits can cause burns this summer
and now to our "Gma" cover that new warning this morning, it says watch out when you are squeezing those limes into your margaritas in the sun this weekend because you could get burned. ABC's Paula Faris is here to explain how. Hey, Paula. Good morning. Who doesn't like a nice summer cocktail, right? So weirdly this happened recently to a friend of mine and said at first her hands looked sunburned then they became swollen and several days later blisters formed because she was making a cocktail squeezing fresh limes. They're some of the best things about summer, lemonade stands and cut beverages with that squeeze of lime. But there is a surprising danger lurking in this summer equation. Certain fruits like limes and lemons plus the sun can equal burns like these. Haley got this burn in Guatemala after squeezing a lime into Selzer and then touching her neck. About eight hours later it was red, hot, burning, extremely It can range from mild rash to significant blistering all over the skin. So it can be confused with shingles. It can be confused with poison ivy. Reporter: Here's how it happens. When a chemical found in certain fruits and vegetables meets strong ultraviolet light it causes a toxic reaction to the skin. With a rash forming within a day and sometimes leading to blisters and second-degree burns. The most common ones are lime, celery and parisly but you can also actually see it with lemon. Reporter: There aren't any real numbers on how common this is but the doctor says it's likely underreported. Most often I see with patients coming back from vacations, you can see it around their mouth, from biting a lime or on their hand from doing a tequila shot. It felt ten times worse to a sunburn. Reporter: These kids were playing in this California backyard when they decided to pick limes from their neighbor's tree. We were daring each other to drink the lime juice so that's how it got all over her face. Reporter: The next day the girls were in excruciating pain from rashes and blisters. Some ending up in the icu. The doctor says these burns may discolor the skin for a long time but it's easy to avoid just wash your skin with soap and water after contact with those certain fruits and vegetables. So, again, make sure you watch your hands with soap and water after you come in contact with these particular vegetables. Cecilia, don't look at the teleprompter. What do you think are the main culprits here? The acids in the lime. Anything else? Sun. Lemon. Lime, lemon, parsnip -- parsley, rather and celery. I said parsnip but everybody is into this big celery craze. Not in my margarita. This happened to my friend and she said the drink was worth something to look out for when you're mixing summer cocktails. We do mix those. Occasion tally. A major afrlgs for a classic

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