What parents should know about the new peanut allergy pill

ABC News' Dr. Jennifer Ashton talks about the potential benefits and risks of the peanut allergy pill breakthrough which could soon be approved by the FDA.
1:50 | 09/16/19

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Transcript for What parents should know about the new peanut allergy pill
An fda panel is now recommending aprofrl of a peanut allergy pill that could be a boon to American families dealing with allergies. Dr. Jen Ashton is here. I didn't know this. More than a million families have kidding dealing with it. Peanut allergies are on the rise in the U.S. We're not sure why but it's about 1.2 million U.S. Teens and kids that suffer from this and obviously in some cases it could be life-threatening. The real issue with this kind of first in its class medication, if you will S. That it allays fears and anxiety on the part of parents about accidental exposure. Remember, you know, it can be very -- Epipen. So think of this almost like a seat belt. It does not guarantee that you won't be seriously injured or killed in a car accident but it's good insurance. This medication does not prevent or treat severe allergies but it does blunt the response. How doest work? It's in the category of oral immunotherapy and the drug is called palforzia. It is literally doses of peanut flour that slightly and increase gradual tolerance and cost is unknown at this point but some analysts saying it could be $4200 a year. Would have to be taken indefinitelily and the opponents of this is a there are potentially severe and increased risk of side effects in the clinical trials 14% of kids taking this drug had serious side effects versus 3% taking placebo which is kind of ironic. You're trying to reduce that risk and the long-term effects are not yet known so we'll be following it. You've dealt with allergies yourself. What kind of overall tips do you have. Get formally tested if you suspect you or your child has an allergy and carry those auto injectors and always read labels and if in doubt, skip it Jen Ashton, thanks very much.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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