New study links women who work stressful jobs with type 2 diabetes

Dr. Jennifer Ashton discusses what you should know about a new study that claims mentally tiring work is associated with type 2 diabetes in women.
2:26 | 03/15/19

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Transcript for New study links women who work stressful jobs with type 2 diabetes
light dusting of To you to a health alert. A new study finds women who have stressful jobs may be more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and Dr. Jen Ashton is here with those details. Tell us what this study found. So first of all it was done in France so may not be applicable to the rest of the world but looked at over 70,000 women and followed them an average of those who rated by questionnaire their jobs as very mentally tiring were at a 21% higher risk of going on to develop type 2 here's the possible theory. Mind/body connection. The hpa access. It's hormonal signals from the brain that then communicate with the pancreas and adrenal glands and can affect blood sugar levels that can go on to lead to type two diabetes. Is it fair to say most women don't factor in the impact stress can have on their bodies. We think we should just fight through it. Some stress can be positive but obviously here we're talking about a potential negative for stress and I want to be clear, Amy. This is not just about diabetes. By the way, these French women were not overweight so there is something possibly deeper at work. Had he had to toe, if you don't deal with stress, it will deal with you and can affect your mood, your sleep, your weight, obviously, we talk about that all the time. Your immune, cardiovascular and reproductive systems so, again, even though this was done on observation, not cause and effect, in my opinion it's a great example of gender specific medicine. We need to understand how stress affects women differently than men. That said a lot of us in the United States have very stressful jobs, we have to be all things to all people. Right. What are some ways you can combat stress? I think we should quit our job, don't you? That's my medical advice. Obviously -- My work has always been my oasis, it's when I go home that the real stress begins. Correct. Way harder. I think, listen, there are some things I literally recommend like a prescription to my patients, meditation, massively effective for reducing stress. You have to keep your body moving and eat a low sugar diet because that triggers inflorida nation and don't have any guilt. If there's still dirty dishes in the sink at night -- I love that you said that. Drop the mom guilt. It's done. All right. Thank you, as always, Dr. Ashton. She will answer your questions live on Facebook.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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