How weight stigma almost prevented a woman from getting a diagnosis

Jen Curran says her cancer diagnosis was overlooked by her doctor because he told her she needed to lose weight.
3:12 | 08/16/19

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Transcript for How weight stigma almost prevented a woman from getting a diagnosis
now to our "Gma" alert about the importance of trusting your gut when it comes no your own health. A comedian is now sharing her own story how a stigma about her weight almost kept her from getting a crucial diagnosis. Kaylee Hartung sat down with her. Good morning, Kaylee. Reporter: Jen has battled her weight before. She lost more than 100 pounds in her early 20s, so when her doctor told her weight loss would solve her problems, she listened to her body. It may have saved her life. This morning, Jen and her husband, Kevin cherishing every moment with their 6-month-old, rose. This is also bittersweet because Jen is battling cancer. Oh, hello. It's chemo day. Reporter: During her second trimester, her blood pressure was high, and there was protein in her urine. She was diagnosed with preeclamplsia. I definitely put it out of my Reporter: Two months after the baby's safe arrival, her blood pressure was back to normal. Doctors observed her protein level was even higher. The doctor's prescription, lose weight. It was like a slap across the face because as someone who has been overweight for on and off most of my life, it hasn't been a health issue for me. I didn't feel like I should argue with her. Reporter: She wanted to follow doctor's orders, but she wanted a opinion. She wanted answers, but she wasn't prepared for what they would find. Shocking, completely shocking. I have this memory of him telling me that I have bone marrow cancer, but I don't feel like I'm in the same room with him. If you have some intuitive feeling that something isn't right, get a second opinion. Reporter: Now Jen is speaking out on Twitter to encourage others to be their owned a have a cot too. She says, if a doctor tells you weight loss is the key to fixing it, get a second opinion. Jen says the shock has worn off. The feeling of empowerment now settling in. So many of us are so afraid to stick our neck on the line, question authority when it's our kids. When it's for our kids, we'll much more readily do it, but do it for yourself because your kids need you around. Ure family needs you around, and women are so brilliant and women know their bodies. Reporter: Beautiful like your gut saved your life? Yes, I do. Reporter: Well, Jen's intuition continues to serve her well. The day she was diagnosed with cancer, Jen asked her O.B. If she could freeze her eggs. He was against it, so once again she sought a second opinion. A fertility doctor assured her it would be safe. Jen plans to beat this cancer into remission and continue to grow her family. Her doctor says the outlook is good, and Cecilia and whit, Jen's intuition tells her it is too. A woman's intuition, always trust it. Kaylee, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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