Kobe Bryant discusses 'Dear Basketball' live on 'GMA'

The NBA legend opens up about the short film that he helped create in the Tribeca Film Festival.
6:58 | 04/24/17

Coming up in the next {{countdown}} {{countdownlbl}}

Coming up next:

{{nextVideo.title}}

{{nextVideo.description}}

Skip to this video now

Now Playing:

{{currentVideo.title}}

Comments
Related Extras
Related Videos
Video Transcript
Transcript for Kobe Bryant discusses 'Dear Basketball' live on 'GMA'
know you have an option B. We are going to talk about this great guest that we have out as well. This has been a wonderful Monday. Welcome NBA superstar, former L.A. Laker, now filmmaker, kobe Bryant. Welcome. Thank you. Hi, robin. Hello, kobe. Hello. Hello, hello. Sit down so we can look at each other eye to eye. That guy in the yellow shirt is your biggest fan ever. What's up, my man. How many times you hear that? But he really is. Yesterday your movie "Dear basketball" premiered at the tribeca film festival. Congratulations on that. I had a chance to sit down with a panel discussion with you and Glen king who is the animator of this. It shows from when you first started basketball to the end of your career, but when you did know, like, I'm in love with this sport, this is what I want to do? You know, I couldn't put the basketball down, you know. Like when my parents bought me a brand new basketball, I found myself laying in bed and shooting with it, just kind of laying there shooting with it. And then I'd fall asleep with it. I'd get up in the morning and I'd play again. I just could not stop. Those are pretty clear signs. Well, when you're at school and you try to do your homework in school, so when you go home you can just play basketball all the day, that's when you know it's serious. I didn't know before this your dad was in the biz, too. So was this always about sort of following in the family footsteps? You know, he never pushed basketball on me. My uncle played basketball, my grandmother played basketball, my cousins, but it was never pushed on me. Did he ever warn you against it? No, no. I just had a basketball and never put it down, never put it down. I like the smell of a new basketball. Oh, my god, yes. Don't get my started. I can completely geek out on the smell of a basketball, the sound it makes when it hits the hardwood or when it goes through the net. How about the sound of your -- The sneakers squeaking or the brand new sneakers and you smell the sneakers. We can go on and on. This wonderful animated short film and I remember talking to you right before your last season and how you were preparing yourself for this next act. You've surrounded yourself with some wonderful people who animated the music. You really have done that again, haven't you, good people around you? That's the beauty of creating things, you have the opportunity to work with people that want to create great things. I couldn't have been more fortunate to come out in the first project and work with Glen king and John Williams. It's just -- you know. The back story on Glen king is he's an incredible animator who's done some of the most iconic characters. Beauty and the beast, tarzan, poke Han tuss, little mermaid. When it comes to hand-drawn animation, he's the guy. And of course John Williams, "Star wars." I called him up, I said, John, I have a piece, I would love for you to score. He's just very -- oh, that would be wonderful. Um, let me just finish this "Star wars" piece. What did you think when you first saw kobe the cartoon? I thought it looked just like gee Anna, our daughter. Little kobe, I looked at the face and I was like, oh, my god, it looks just like Gigi. Speaking of your kids, 14 and 10, what did they think of the film first of all, and secondly, are they the harshest critics you have? Well, it held their attention. That's a clue. That's a good start. But they, just like any parent, my kids don't listen to me. I say, hey, you got to work hard and this stuff and -- nothing. 14 and 10. Nothing, crickets the they got to hear it from Beyonce or somebody else. They can't hear it from me. You want to see a little bit of it? The moment I started rolling my dad's tube socks and shooting imaginary game-winning shots in the great western forum, I knew one thing was real. Wow. I want more. I want more. I know. The way they morph from when you're a kid rolling up the socks to a basketball and jumping in celebration winning with the Lakers and laying on your bed as a kid, all these memories, and when you guys sat down, how did you take something that was a love letter to basketball and think this needs to be an animated film? I tried to write it very in a visual way versus simply coming out and saying this is how I feel. Try to put it through story. So you see the dedication and commitment through rolling my dad's tube socks, or you see it through all the vhs tapes of all the past games so you can see the growth and you can see the love. I'm curious, when we look at that and some of the stuff like you're doing all this stuff, celebrating and it shows muscles, did you go to -- I'm serious, did you look at Glen at one point and say, hey man, my bicep is a little too small, you need to pump the bicep up a little bit. You got to chisel that up right there. Unfortunately, I cannot hide from what the TV is showing. I've been a twig forever. Lara and I were wondering, do you miss it? No, I don't. It's crazy but -- Never? No. I've given -- I started playing when I was 2. So after playing for 20 years in the league, what I have now is everything that I've learned from the game I carry with me to this day, so the game never truly left me. Physically yes, but emotionally and the things that I write all stem from the game. It's still a part of me. Then the other thing is that for athletes that come next, understanding that there is a finality to it and that's okay. It's very hard to let go of something that you've done for half your life, and it's kind of become who you are. There's a difference between doing what you do versus understanding that that is not who you are. And hopefully other athletes can see and understand that. A great lesson. Thank you. Thank you. Thank you. We won't put you on the spot of who's going to win it this time. Okay, cool.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

{"duration":"6:58","description":"The NBA legend opens up about the short film that he helped create in the Tribeca Film Festival. ","mediaType":"default","section":"ABCNews/GMA","id":"46976254","title":"Kobe Bryant discusses 'Dear Basketball' live on 'GMA'","url":"/GMA/video/kobe-bryant-discusses-dear-basketball-live-gma-46976254"}