Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Cases Could Be on the Rise

One Oklahoma mother had parts of both arms and legs amputated after she was bitten by a tick carrying the potentially deadly disease.
1:51 | 08/15/15

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Transcript for Rocky Mountain Spotted Fever Cases Could Be on the Rise
An important health warning about tick bites. An Oklahoma mother lost all four limbs after she was bitten by a tick carrying a potentially deadly disease, called rocky mountain spotted fever. It's on the rise with about 2,000 cases this year. We don't hear a whole lot about rocky mountain spotted fever. Why are you concerned? Here's what people need to know. This is a bacterial infection. It's been reported all over the country. Not just in the rocky mountain region. It's been reported at all time of the year. Though we are in peak tick season right now. It's reported in urban areas. Found in people that have not been camping. People need to know the symptoms. These are vague. They can mimic a lot of viruses. Fever, headache, nausea, vomiting. The rash may not appear in everyone. It can be difficult to see in people with dark skin. The key is, if there is a suspicion these symptoms could be related to a tick bite. The recommendations is to start doxycycline antibiotics. You say prevention is key. What do you recommend? If you're going into the wood, use insect repellant containing deet. Wear long, loose, light-colored clothing to it's easier to see the Tix. They like to bite and bury themselves in hair-bearing areas. If you find a tick, remove it entirely with tweezers. No burning. No drowning it in alcohol or petroleum. Just tweezers. Check your children. And pets. So good to hear this reminder, Jen. Thank you. We switch gears and turn to a bit of a happier subject.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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