Activism finds a new place: TikTok

The social platform known for launching dance crazes is attracting more people who wish to express their political views. Two influencers on the app talk about the content they post.
6:48 | 07/23/20

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Transcript for Activism finds a new place: TikTok
Sometimes it takes just 15 seconds for a message to spread across the world. Just ask the young users behind tik Tok. Now some of the digital, savvy creators are turning the fun into activism. Here's "Nightline's" ah shan sing. Reporter: Taylor Cassidy is recording a tik Tok. But this isn't one of those viral dances. She's recording her latest post. It was one of the first genres to show African-Americans as a super hero. Reporter: For her nearly 2 million followers, she's already got more than 38 million likes and the blue check mark, validation for the aspiring activist. Hundreds of thousands of people have started coming to this little black girl's channel to support her. I still can't fully fathom it, but I'm so thankful. Reporter: Tik Tok. Best known as a launch pad for chart-topping hits, eye popping stunts and endless dance crazes. Don't let anyone on the app fool you. Reporter: Is now becoming a go-to space for activism. A preferred outlet for young people itching to voice their opinions and enact change. Director of tik Tok's creative community says that the app's new role is an organic progression. People have been opened up to be able to express their authentic voice and things that they also care about, not just having fun but inspiring people, educating people, informing Reporter: Hash tags about black lives matter wracking up more than 17 billion views. Pride, 17 billion. It's a place where teenagers go to post information about how to protest. Where protests are happening, what's happening on the ground. Tik Tok is the real time news platform. Reporter: She quickly recognize the potential as a mega phone for social issues. Ly been doing motivational talks on Instagram. When I was on tik Tok I was like, I'm going to see what happens. People really loved it. There's a fire inside of you. No one can burn it out. In February is when black history month started and black history has always been deeply rooted in my heart, and this black history month just felt special, so I was like, I'm going to really do something to educate people. Reporter: In a series, Cassidy showed little known facts about black icons. This post, only here second one of the month, has more than 1 million views. I had found out a few months prior. She captivated. We've seen these viral videos that have opened up the country. Did you find in this time that your voice needed to be heard? Absolutely. There are a lot of tik Tok users that use their platform to disenfranchise the black lives matter movement. And I think it really proves how important this is that we provide authentic information and real information so that op people don't mistake the black lives matter movement as something that it's not. Reporter: The platform is also a hotbed of political commentary, most notably, co conservative ones. You guys wanting this guy to fail is wanting to crash the plane. There was a period of time when I posted normal tik toks. I tried to be funny. Did it didn't work out. I noticed I would start making trump-related videos, talking about what I agree with or disagree with, and they were massively successful.r: Reporter: Cam Higby is the founder of this. E not everything is suitable for children. You know what's so funny about the left? The lack of loyalty they have for each other. They love to eat their own. There's tons of right wing content that performs incredibly well. It's because people are constantly dunking on refuting their videos. I think they post a lot of videos that people feel are racist or people feel that they disagree with. Reporter: Higby says he embraces backlash. W I would like it if people who disagree saw our content, I want to display my ideas so people will disagree and I can have conversations. Reporter: Ironically, president trump disagrees with cam's platform of choice. Mike Pompeo calling it a national security threat because it's a chinese-owned company. I will be upset if it's going to get banned, but I would also understand why he's doing it.r: Reporter: In a statement, tik Tok says there's a lot of misinformation about tik Tok out there. Tik Tok has an American CEO and a team that works diligently to develop a best-in-class security. It has strict controls on employee access.ese these are the facts. Both Higby and Cassidy find that tik Tok is an important place to express ideologies. It's great that people on the right and left get involved in politics when they're younger. Reporter: You're 17. You can't even vote yet. If I can't vote, I can influence others to vote for the T candidate that best suits their a beliefs and what can really improve our society. If you can vote, you can help ch that change.ep Reporter: While she waits for 2024 to roll around, for now she'll keep creating. That post about black-sploitation, she got millions of views. Make sure that your heart is in the right place to make impact first. Because that's how you're going to reach people. How that's how you're going to make an impact.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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