Music industry forced to rethink concerts, tours and more in COVID-19 pandemic

Keith Urban, like other big entertainers, talks about trying to reconnect with fans at a distance, while tour managers, roadies, engineers and others are trying to find ways to get back to work.
5:52 | 05/16/20

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Transcript for Music industry forced to rethink concerts, tours and more in COVID-19 pandemic
Reporter: The big stage, the lights and a crowd of cars. Want to take a bow It was really magical. Reporter: Keith urban performing for health care work workers at a drive-in movie theater outside Nashville, Tennessee. It felt amazing to be playing, people honking horns and flicking headlights. Reporter: You're one of the first performers to perform in front of a live audience since this all started. I had the idea for a drive-in over a month ago. We set out figuring out how to do it in a safe way. How the crew could be minimized. Musician on stage could be minimal, everything had to be very, very minimal. Reporter: Urban's move a huge first step as the world of live music tries to find its footing amidst the coronavirus pandemic. Freezing and stopping and not doing anything was not an option. So how do we move forward steadily, methodically. Not just for us but for the audience. Reporter: The industry prepares to lose $9 billion in ticket sales alone. Some of today's biggest entertainers are finding new ways to adapt and connect with fans. Reporter: From a new number one song fueled by a tik Tok dance craze. Not to mention life-stroom deejay sets that have turned living rooms into personal nightclubs. Today's world of music looks dramatically different than it did two months ago. As artists, roadies and industry insiders figure out what's next. We've seen everyone from cardi B take over their Instagram live. It's been really special to see so many musicians come together for their fans. We have 46,000. Reporter: One of those artists, legendary deejay, he's been called a hero for sets called "Club quarantine." With hundreds of thousands of viewers, he turned into a you had Michelle Obama, mark Zuckerberg. It just kept growing. Reporter: But for someone who built his career on the road, performing for audiences of thousands, he says it's still not the same. I was on the plane every day. Once the pandemic hit and I will to be still and sit at home, I honestly didn't know what to do. Reporter: It's a sentiment shared by people all over the industry. Production artist working for Kanye west even others says he's never seen anything like this. The only thing that even comes close at all would be 9/11. That was a few weeks, maximum a month, and everybody got back up to it. Reporter: He says there are many being forgotten. There's 12 million people in live entertainment in the U.S. Alone. Reporter: His team was supposed to kick off Justin Bieber's tour tonight in Seattle. It's kind of sad for me and the fellas that we're not doing that today, but our time will come. Reporter: He spends about ten months a year on the road. Now he and 87 employees are out of work. We went from having the biggest year planned, everybody knew this was the biggest year we had, to zero dollars overnight. Reporter: What's keeping you up at night? My crews and their families being able to eat. You know, independent contractors often live check to check. There's a sense of community, and there's a sense of strength and great art being made through Reporter: It's a setback the world had never seen before. But, if there's anything about the American music industry and the people that help make both it and us move, it's that they're resilient, and they can't wait to be back. The live entertainment industry in times like this is often the first to close and the last to return. Does that worry you at all? It worries me to a certain extent that I believe in music so much. I want to hear the drums, you know, I want to feel the music. You can't get that off the computer. There's nothing better than live music, and it's truly the only language we all speak. I miss being crammed into a room with a bunch of strangers. I miss being sweaty. I miss having a drink in my hand. I mean, there's nothing like human people scream when you drop their favorite song. You can watch the way someone's body is moving, like that's how I deejayed. It was base the on body it was nothing like feeling that energy When I'm able to meet fans, backstage. Reporter: Do you feel you got to scratch a little bit of that itch yesterday? Definitely, to have a guitar in my hands and be on a stage felt extraordinary, felt like

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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