Wedding crashers normally go for the party, but this one allegedly stole gifts

The cultural phenomenon of crashing weddings once meant showing up to wedding receptions uninvited and posing as a guest, but one suspect in Texas has allegedly been stealing gifts instead.
5:13 | 08/15/19

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Transcript for Wedding crashers normally go for the party, but this one allegedly stole gifts
For a bride and groom saying their "I do's," it can be one of the most important days in their lives. It was a relatively large wedding. But for Texans Dani and Kinsey shicke, who we spoke to while traveling back from their honeymoon, their happily ever after overshadowed by a stranger who crashed their celebration and made off with some of their gifts. The alleged crasher has also been accused of stealing from at least three other weddings. We know for sure that she stole a $200 gift card and tickets to disneyland. Yeah. And just some other gift cards and cash gifts. Texas authorities are on the hunt for the suspect who can be seen on this surveillance tape allegedly shopping with stolen gift cards. The comal county sheriff's office is offering a reward of up to $4000 for any tips. What happened to this couple was a crime, but thanks to memorable performances by Vince Vaughn and Owen Wilson, the term wedding crasher usually describes a much more light hearted cinematic moment. Becoming more common, celebrities ripping a page from the silver screen. Back in 2014, Beyonce accidentally crashed this couple's special day when touring a church in Italy. Just a few years later, Taylor Swift surprised these superfans and then serenaded them, performing blank space as the bride and groom shared their first dance. Maroon 5 even staged an entire music video around a day-long marathon crash for their hit single "Sugar." A few years ago, I got in on the fun too. Dan and Jessica Miele got married here in westchester, new York, when we decided to soft crash their wedding. They were great sports, the So what is this fascination some have with going where they're not invited? Is it the free food, the open bar? That's what one bride and groom wanted to know after their wedding photos and videos included these fun-loving freeloaders. I had asked around my side of the family and my husband's side of the family and made sure that they weren't somebody who I just hadn't met before. The two can be seen boogying on the dance floor, drinks in hand, practically going out of their way to be noticed. And now, the perfect strangers are permanently part of this newlywed's photo album. Krista Reilly took to Facebook to try and match a name with a face and the local media turned up the drama. The mystery of the identity of the wedding crashers has been solved. For Krista, at least, turns out the wedding crashers themselves noticed they had gone from the hunter to the hunted and reached out privately to the bride to apologize. Krista wouldn't reveal their names. She says she forgives, but with this wedding album, how can she forget? Think it's tacky. I think it's rude because that's somebody's special day. Watch, as this guy enters the beautiful Tustin ranch golf club in California. Cops say he swiped up all the cash and gift cards at a wedding reception here. Police say the suspect was checking to see if the coast is clear, then covers the gift box with his jacket and makes a quick getaway. Cops picked him up about a month later and charged him with burglary and grand theft. This Pennsylvania guy was also caught after slipping into receptions and stealing 12 grand in cash, gifts, even the bride's shoes. He finally got an invitation, but from a judge who sentenced him to a minimum of four years. And you have to think about not just your guests but other people who may have access to the wedding venue including staff and vendors. It's always nice to give people the benefit of the doubt in order to totally take that equation off the table. We recommend registering online Back at the Miele wedding, we spotted their gift box. It was positioned right where the experts say it should be, behind the couple, away from the exits and with security standing nearby. How much do you think is sitting over there? 40? 30, 40, hoping more. Thousand? Yeah. Wow, so you better have some security guards on that. We do, we do. If you think that someone's crashing a wedding it's best not to ignore it. And it's also best to make sure that they actually are crasher. Maybe the second or third cousin from your spouse's family that you maybe haven't been introduced to yet so ask around. Or better yet go introduce yourself. Hi I don't think we've met yet. As for the Dani and Kinsey, even though th they think it's more important to focus on the bigger picture. We were a little bit upset at first, but we were just glad that we got married. Yes. And that everyone was there, and that no one got hurt. These newlyweds are more generous than most. Increasingly the happy occasion is seen as a target of opportunity. Beware. For nightline I'm Paula Farris.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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