Native American activists react to new look from Washington’s NFL team

Native American activists explain their lifelong fight to persuade schools, colleges and professional sports teams to drop names that may be offensive.
4:37 | 08/07/20

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Transcript for Native American activists react to new look from Washington’s NFL team
Washington's NFL team has a new look the temporarily renamed Washington football team treated video workers taking down murals at their facilities. Saying they are starting fresh they also change their uniforms now featuring just the players' numbers on the helmets now more logo. This morning we're hearing from native American activists who spent their lives advocating for this kind of changed. They're talking about why this is about so much more than a team name Keira Phillips has that story. This is a cultural calling the from the uptown wounds and sounds to summon all nations here tribal to data. And make it known hair. For change has been her. I. For decades native Americans like Mary Phillips who is Laguna Pueblo and Omaha. Have stood in protest. Battling to persuade schools colleges and professional sports teams like the Washington Redskins. To drop American Indian names and mascots. That many people deemed derogatory. You don't even say. The word Redskins even asked me not to seat in the inner you forgive me I just want to put in reference here you referred to it as the and because it's the word that. Conjures up so many horrible spots. And it is. A slur towards native Americans for those who still haven't heard that trying to educate people to understand that this word. This teen celebrates that's actually celebrates the color of my skin by seeing that it is red and their for we can call you this name that. From you know history that proves that you are. But worth 200 dollars your had your scalp is worth 200 dollars and people would hunt you down. For that. And I was just the beginning and cures full story which will air later tonight but Keira is here with us now live it tells little us more about this. Q does put a moment you had their native Americans have been protesting this team named for decades so what shall finally drove this change now. Yeah they sure have and you know what it comes down to Diane it was the death of George Floyd. By the hands of Minneapolis. Police departments and the protests that we saw all across the country actually all over the world and this this call. For for social justice and and to talk about racism and can front. Not only the issues with police but also. Names on and college teams football teams in particular. The Washington team so. You know all the the the native leaders and tribal leaders with whom I spoke. Said that was the beginning this was a spin off of the black lives matter movement all triggered by what happened in Minneapolis. But there's actually a little bit more to that as well it wasn't like. Dan Snyder the only the owner of the team had this awakening for for social justice. You know he he was he was absolutely. Insisted on not changing the name. And then what happened was investors came forward. And and reached out to big sponsors like FedEx and Nike. And said that you know we're gonna pull are billions of dollars and lets you support changing this name. So when it came down to it Diane it really was the power of the dollar. That change this but it didn't start with the protest and this call for justice around the world that's really what got it going but. It did come down to money in the end it's. Oh frequently does care and in the current team name is just a place over place holder I should say so how are they doing on finding a permanent new name. Yeah that's a good question apparently they are in no rush for they are taking their time with this because it's a really big deal and as you know Diane a lot of people are going to be weighing in on what they think the name change should be so there really isn't a date for when. We will hear what the official name is. But I can tell you chief Billy. And also who EU will meet in this piece sees the Indian chief for the Piscataway nation and then also Mary Phillips. A cool with whom you saw that piece they like warriors they think warriors is a really strong name and that should be a big contender. The Washington warriors I like it nice a generation to. Karen thanks so much for the report and you can see cares full report on ABC news prime tonight at 7 eastern right here on ABC news live.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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