MLK's Words Still Carry Weight 50 Years Later

The director of the King Institute at Stanford University calls Martin Luther King's "Nobel Lecture" one of his "most important speeches."
1:07 | 01/19/16

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Transcript for MLK's Words Still Carry Weight 50 Years Later
Finally tonight here, on this martin Luther king Jr. Holiday, a rare recording of king's 1964 Nobel peace prize lecture, on nonviolence, on dignity, on equality. Nonviolence is a powerful and just weapon. Indeed, it is a weapon unique in history, which cuts without wounding and ennobles a man who wields it. Reporter: Then, king's declaration that the fight for civil rights was far from over. The demand for dignity, equality, jobs and citizenship will not be abandoned or deluded or postponed. If that means resistance and conflict, we shall not flinch. We shall now be cowed. We are no longer afraid. Reporter: And he would end this way. Free at last, free at last. Thank god almighty, we are free at last. Thank you. And we thank you for watching on this holiday. I'm David Muir. I hope to see you right back here tomorrow night.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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