Parents share their struggles as schools reopen virtually

Of the 50 million public school students learning remotely, 15 to 16 million lack internet access or devices to learn effectively, with children of color and those in rural areas impacted the most.
2:36 | 09/22/20

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Transcript for Parents share their struggles as schools reopen virtually
We're going to turn next tonight to our month-long series of reports, "Turning point, kws examine anyoning the conversation on race across this tonight here, the digital divide. With more than 50 million American children learning at home in this pan deck ING, this evening, we hear from families across this country. What about children that don't have access to computers and wifi? ABC's Adrienne Bankert on the challenges facing so many families. Reporter: Tonight, with New York City public schools reopening virtually, including some in-person classes, parents across the country are sharing with us just how tough remote learning can be, despite attempts to bridge the digital divide. From Texas -- Trying to figure out how to manage three kids who are doing virtual learning on different schedules. Reporter: To Missouri -- How do you feel about learning at home instead of at school? I feel kind of sad about it. Reporter: To rural California -- The internet connection stops so it kicks her out. Then it starts again and it stops again, so, she doesn't get the whole class like she should. Reporter: Of the 50 million public school students learning remotely due to the pandemic, 15 to 16 million lack internet or devices to learn effectively. And 9 million don't have any access. Children of color and those in rural communities are particularly impacted. Thank you. Reporter: Since we spoke to them in may, east side house settlement has given out hundreds of tablets and wifi hotspots to bronx students, but it's just the start. Just because we handed the student a tablet and gave them wifi, it doesn't make them more academically ready. Reporter: And across the U.S., parents told us that even with internet access and devices, there's so much stress. In the bronx, fatema mustafa's kindergartener zarar has autism and ADHD. He'll return to class next week. She said the lack of socialization in virtual Luke:ing has caused him distress and meltdowns at home. I'm hoping he starts going back to normal again and learn his friends again. That's one of the other reasons, the social aspect of it. Reporter: Devon Conley, a trustee of a school district in mountain view California, says even in tech rich silicon valley, 32% of students are low income. I personally know a family that is paying $150 a month for internet access for children to do online learning, but they can't afford food. We can do better than that. We have to do better than that. Reporter: There are a number of nonprofits and corporations work, all over the country to help kids get online and to learn and parents and teachers can find a list of those resources on our home page. David? Abcnews.com, really important reporting. Adrienne, thank you.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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