Politicians call for ethics Investigation over senators' sale of stocks

Congress races to negotiate emergency aid, while two senators have been criticized for selling off stocks after receiving official coronavirus briefings just before the market plunge.
1:49 | 03/21/20

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Transcript for Politicians call for ethics Investigation over senators' sale of stocks
This evening at least two senators are under fire for selling stock before the coronavirus pandemic. And at least one of them and their private words. Here's Mary Bruce. Reporter: As the Dow continued to plunge today, serious questions about whether senators have been using insider information on capitol hill to pull their own money out of the stock market. Last month, Republican senator Richard burr assured Americans, the United States today is better prepared than ever before. A week later, congress received a closed-door briefing on the impact of the virus. The very next day, burr sold off up to $1.7 million dollars in stock, including investments in the hotel and travel industries. As the situation grew worse, weeks later at a private event, burr shared a more dire warning in this audio obtained by NPR. It is much more aggressive in its transmission than anything that we have seen in recent history. Reporter: Today burr said he relied solely on public news reports to guide his decisions. Understanding how it might appear, he's now calling for the senate ethics committee to investigate. On the same day she was briefed on the virus, Republican senator Kelly Loeffler also sold more than $1 million in holdings. The Georgia senator, whose husband is the chair of the New York stock exchange insists their investment decisions are made by third party advisors without their knowledge. I have seen some of those stories. It's absolutely false and it could not be true. I am not involved in the decisions around buying and selling. Reporter: There are also questions around Jim inhofe and Dianne Feinstein who both sold off hundreds of thousands of dollars in stocks but they say they were not at the coronavirus briefing and insists they were not directly involve in the decisions to sell. Mary Bruce tonight.

This transcript has been automatically generated and may not be 100% accurate.

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